Rudolfoletto by Douglas Lanphier Wheeler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Dec. 4, 2015

"For readers unfamiliar with opera, this adventure will likely soar over heads like reindeer over rooftops; but for fans, it should generate a Christmas 'Bravo!' with the promise of many requested encores."
A new Christmas tale to share with children features singing reindeer and a treatment of the traditional Rudolph story with all the trills and leitmotifs of an opera. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN

"A fast-paced romantic drama with a touch of Roma magic."
When a teenage girl in 1925 Chicago kills her violent stepfather, her mother takes the blame in this YA novel. Read full book review >

THE BLUE BIRD'S PALACE by Orianne Lallemand
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"With its folkloric elements, positive but not preachy message about sharing, and strong visual presentation, this will make an excellent read-aloud. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Natasha, deprived of maternal love by her mother's death but adored by her farmer father, grows into a selfish young woman in this original tale "inspired by the Russian folk tradition" and first published in France. Read full book review >
LAST MAN OUT by Mike Lupica
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Believable pain and recovery against a solid football backdrop. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A middle school football player grieves his father's death both on and off the field. Read full book review >
BEAUTIFUL by Stacy McAnulty
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Celebrated here for their particularity and their diversity, girls are given the space to find beauty in all kinds of ways. (Picture book. 4-8)"
McAnulty and Lew-Vriethoff shatter the cultural definition of "beauty" by showing young girls of all races and abilities studying nature, dressing up as pirates, experimenting in chemistry, and more. Read full book review >

GOING WILD by Lisa McMann
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A beginning full of potential. (Science fiction. 8-12)"
Life gets strange for 12-year-old Charlie Wilde after she moves to a new town and finds a bracelet that grants her animal-based powers. Read full book review >
TREECOLOGY by Monica Russo
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"A labor of love reflecting years of experience in the field as well as in writing for young readers, this offers a path to interesting explorations of the natural world. (glossary, common and scientific names, resources, teacher's guide, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 8-15)"
Enter the world of trees! Read full book review >
TURN ON THE NIGHT by Geraldo Valério
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"More than a bedtime story: a treat from a masterful artist. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A little girl falls asleep—clutching her picture book and her stuffed-animal hen—and a joyous, wordless adventure unfolds. Read full book review >
WHAT DOG KNOWS by Sylvia Vanden Heede
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"A refreshingly unconventional mix of science and storytelling, of physical work and brain work. (Informational fiction. 7-10)"
In a companion to Wolf and Dog (2013), further quirky interchanges between two animal friends spark brief excursions into diverse topics from bones and dinosaurs to space travel and buried treasure. Read full book review >
FRAZZLED by Booki Vivat
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A hilarious, Asian-American heroine guaranteed to provoke laughs—not anxiety. (Fiction. 8-13)"
Abbie Wu, Chinese-American preteen and worrywart, is doomed. Read full book review >
THE LITTLEST BIGFOOT by Jennifer Weiner
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Enchanting right up to the sequel-beckoning end. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Two girls, one a human and one a Yare, or Bigfoot, feel that they don't fit in with their families and communities. Read full book review >
TITO THE MAGICIAN by Guido van Genechten
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Genuine self-confidence, humility, and a sense of wonder: bravo, Tito. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Being a magician is no easy trick. It hinges on one of the human qualities that's most difficult to achieve. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >