INTO THE RIVER by Ted Dawe
Released: June 14, 2016

"Readers will either see themselves in Devon and his story or will reconsider their own roles in their schools' social structures. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A Maori teen's brutal experiences at boarding school provide an object lesson in how systems of power perpetuate themselves. Read full book review >
HOW IT FEELS TO FLY by Kathryn Holmes
Released: June 14, 2016

"Less about ballet than about therapy, but interesting nevertheless. (Fiction. 12-18)"
Samantha dreams of becoming a professional ballerina like her mom, but her body is changing into one that the ballet world will not accept. Read full book review >

THE BALLAD OF A BROKEN NOSE by Arne Svingen
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 14, 2016

"Lovely and profound. (Fiction. 11-14)"
A boy in a small Norwegian city comes into his own socially and artistically in this import. Read full book review >
AUTOFOCUS by Lauren Gibaldi
Released: June 14, 2016

"Adoption entails lifelong losses along with joys, but its hard questions and nuanced complexities are airbrushed from this affluence-cushioned world. (Fiction. 12-16)"
A photography-class assignment on the meaning of family prompts Maude, an adopted high school senior in Florida, to learn about her deceased birth mother, Claire. Read full book review >
CHANGE PLACES WITH ME by Lois Metzger
Released: June 14, 2016

"An interesting, experimental near-future character study. (Science fiction. 12-18)"
Rose, a quiet, shy girl living in New York City in 2029, suddenly comes out of her shell. Read full book review >

WE WERE NEVER HERE by Jennifer Gilmore
Released: June 14, 2016

"The romance is so-so, but the dual portrayal of friendship and adjustment to a rarely discussed condition is sensitive and insightful. (Romance. 14-18)"
After 16-year-old Lizzie doubles over at summer camp, she enters the hospital and a "horror movie" of pain, tests, and vulnerability. Read full book review >
RED VELVET CRUSH by Christina Meredith
Released: June 14, 2016

"Though the ending leans toward melodrama, this fast-paced story of sibling rivalry and betrayal should appeal to a wide teen audience. (Fiction. 13-17)"
Meredith explores the difficult relationship between two sisters: one who harbors a secret talent and the other who lusts after any spotlight. Read full book review >
THE TRANSATLANTIC CONSPIRACY by G.D. Falksen
Released: June 14, 2016

"Only for insatiable fans of the genre or author. (Steampunk. 12-18)"
A historical adventure sports a steampunk veneer, like an undersea Murder on the Orient Express. Read full book review >
CURE FOR THE COMMON UNIVERSE by Christian McKay Heidicker
Released: June 14, 2016

"Teen readers deserve a thought-provoking, complex story about a boy who begins to understand his internalized misogyny; this is not that book. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A 16-year-old is forced to face his shortcomings at a rehab center for video-gaming addicts. Read full book review >
IVORY AND BONE by Julie Eshbaugh
Released: June 14, 2016

"Narrative artifice aside, this is an involving story solidly told, doing credit to its inspiration and sources. (Historical fiction. 12-18)"
A gender-flipped revisiting of Pride and Prejudice translates surprisingly well into the Ice Age—until it doesn't.Read full book review >
A HISTORY OF AMBITION IN 50 HOAXES by Gale Eaton
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 10, 2016

"We have met the hoaxsters, and they are us: family stories, human progress, and often enough the pinball nature of our history. (Nonfiction. 10-16)"
Hoaxes are a lot of fun, tell us much about ourselves, and sometimes, just sometimes, change the course of history. Read full book review >
THE COLOR OF DARKNESS by Ruth Hatfield
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: June 7, 2016

"While the subject matter is dark and at times raw, the message of the strength of the human spirit is ultimately uplifting. (Fantasy. 11-14)"
Book 2 in the middle-grade Book of Storms trilogy. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >