STATE OF GRACE by Hilary Badger
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Most intriguing and provocative. (Science fiction. 14-18)"
Would people truly be happy if they could return to the Garden of Eden before the Fall? A girl lives blissfully within such a world, convinced she and everything else was created by Dot, her beloved deity. Read full book review >
LAST NIGHT AT THE CIRCLE CINEMA by Emily Franklin
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An ambitious failure. (Fiction. 14-16)"
Three best friends spend the night before graduation in a run-down movie house. Read full book review >

VENGEANCE ROAD by Erin Bowman
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"The novel starts with a bang in an interesting setting, but it quickly fizzles into melodrama. (Historical romance. 12-18)"
Kate Thompson seeks revenge at any cost after her father is killed by a gang of robbers who believe he had information about a mythical gold mine. Read full book review >
TRUEST by Jackie Lea Sommers
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A satisfyingly realistic portrait of small-town life and one girl's spiritual and emotional maturation within it. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A girl looks for definition during the undefinable time before her senior year of high school. Read full book review >
CATCH THE ZOLT by Phillip Gwynne
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Readers won over by Dom will hope the next installment brings some clarity to the over-the-top plot. (Adventure. 10-14)"
Imported from Australia, this volume kicks off a series chronicling how one young man deals with a highly unusual family legacy that goes back generations. Read full book review >

THE FLINKWATER FACTOR by Pete Hautman
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Fast, funny episodes featuring creative takes on close-to-reality science. (Science fiction. 8-14)"
Hautman's latest features wacky adventures in a near-future small town packed with engineers. Read full book review >
A 52-HERTZ WHALE by Bill Sommer
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"This briefest of novels might have been more satisfying as a robust short story. (Epistolary novel. 12-15)"
An open-ended meditation on loneliness and connection, told in crisscrossing email threads. Read full book review >
DREAM THINGS TRUE by Marie Marquardt
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A flawed yet worthy examination of undocumented immigration in the American South through the lens of young love. (Fiction. 13-17)"
Alma and Evan are teenagers living drastically different versions of the American dream in the southern United States. Read full book review >
SMART AND SPINELESS by Ann Downer
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Science facts more surprising than science fiction for teen readers. (endnotes, glossary, bibliography, further reading) (Nonfiction. 12-16)"
The lack of a spine, or even a brain, doesn't keep invertebrates from learning, remembering, and solving problems. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"The visual element gives this memoir particular immediacy for audiences who 'don't understand what is happening right now, to kids just like them.' (Graphic memoir. 10-14)"
An ex-child soldier tells his horrifying tale, beginning with being kidnapped at the age of 5 and forced to kill his best friend. Read full book review >
ISABELLE DAY REFUSES TO DIE OF A BROKEN HEART by Jane St. Anthony
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Stories for the middle-grade audience that deal with the suicide of a parent are few, and this one, sensitive but never syrupy, stands out. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Although spunky Isabelle refuses to die of a broken heart, sometimes it seems like it might happen anyway. Read full book review >
AUGGIE & ME by R.J.  Palacio
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"Not only a companion to Wonder, but a wonder in itself. (Fiction. 8-14)"
In the companion novel to Wonder, (2012) three students at Beecher Prep middle school tell stories that connect with Auggie Pullman's dramatic arrival into their worlds.Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >