Entertainment & Sports Book Reviews (page 2)

ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 2016

"First-rate reporting and a seminar in how to employ context in investigative and historical journalism."
A veteran journalist uses a variety of lenses to illuminate the dark story of the Black Legion, an association of murderous (white) domestic terrorists who briefly thrived in the upper Midwest. Read full book review >
THE DIVINE MADNESS OF PHILIP K. DICK by Kyle Arnold
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"An inquiry into the SF master's mind that will interest only the most devoted of Dick's fans."
Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) sits on the couch for some deep analysis. Read full book review >

SWEET DREAMS AND FLYING MACHINES by Mark Ribowsky
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"Just another in the onslaught of rock bios and memoirs—a disappointing follow-up to the author's excellent Dreams to Remember."
A biography that confirms both the best and the worst that fans have heard about the archetypal 1970s singer/songwriter. Read full book review >
SOBER STICK FIGURE by Amber Tozer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2016

"The urgency and desperation of addiction told through crisp, biting sarcasm and self-deprecating humor."
A stand-up comedian reclaims her life after three decades of alcohol abuse. Read full book review >
DODGERLAND by Michael Fallon
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 2016

"Not a conventional championship-season kind of treatment but a thoughtful, comprehensive, and even deeply personal account of a boisterous era whose echoes remain loud, even painful."
The late-1970s Los Angeles Dodgers are a not-so-distant window through which we can view American culture, then and now. Read full book review >

HOW TO WRITE LIKE TOLSTOY by Richard Cohen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 31, 2016

"Mostly standard writing advice, minus the bullet points, plus the gleanings from a lifetime of reading and thought."
A veteran editor, teacher, and author assembles some advice for aspiring writers of fiction. Read full book review >
THE WORLD ACCORDING TO STAR WARS by Cass R. Sunstein
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 31, 2016

"Certainly odd but also smart and interesting. For any student who wants to write a term paper on Star Wars, this book could serve as a rich resource."
An exploration of how Star Wars "illuminates childhood, the complicated relationship between good and evil, rebellions, political change, and constitutional law." Read full book review >
THE VIEW FROM THE CHEAP SEATS by Neil Gaiman
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 31, 2016

"Gaiman's many fans will love this collection, which showcases the author's wit, wisdom, and deep appreciation for art and the people who make it."
The acclaimed author shares his thoughts on stories of all kinds: books, comics, movies, music, and more. Read full book review >
PORCELAIN by Moby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A distinctive addition to the recent spate of well-written memoirs by contemporary musicians, a list that would include the likes of Elvis Costello, Patti Smith, and Carrie Brownstein."
DJ and producer Moby relives the career-defining years, 1989-1999, leading to his international breakthrough album "Play" (1999). Read full book review >
HOW TO MAKE WHITE PEOPLE LAUGH by Negin Farsad
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"Farsad combines throwaway laughs with some keeper insights. Readers may sense that she has a smarter, funnier book on the way later in her career."
A memoir/essay collection from a self-described "hyphenated American…an Iranian-Muslim-female-honey-mustard-enthusiast" who is also a comedian, writer, filmmaker, and TED talker. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: May 19, 2016

"A practical, accessible, and fun guide to planning the sailing adventure of a lifetime."
A debut book provides a practical sailing guide to world circumnavigation. Read full book review >
LATE TO THE BALL by Gerald Marzorati
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"What begins as a straightforward chronicle of a not-entirely-unusual midlife quest evolves into an examination of midlife reinvention in general, both the how and the why."
A career editor and writer takes up tennis at age 60—not as a hobby, but competitively. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Chris Cleave
June 14, 2016

In bestseller Chris Cleave’s latest novel Everyone Brave Is Forgiven, it’s London, 1939. The day war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up. Tom Shaw decides to ignore the war—until he learns his roommate Alistair Heath has unexpectedly enlisted. Then the conflict can no longer be avoided. Young, bright, and brave, Mary is certain she’d be a marvelous spy. When she is—bewilderingly—made a teacher, she finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams. “Among all the recent fictions about the war, Cleave’s miniseries of a novel is a surprising standout,” our reviewer writes, “with irresistibly engaging characters who sharply illuminate issues of class, race, and wartime morality.” View video >