Essays & Anthologies Book Reviews

READING AND WRITING CANCER by Susan Gubar
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"Bright, upbeat, and empathetic, Gubar argues convincingly that words have the power to heal."
For cancer sufferers, words can lift the spirit. Read full book review >
UNFORBIDDEN PLEASURES by Adam Phillips
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"A dense, challenging, provocative meditation on morality and identity."
What would society look like if it did not promote the idea "that we are primarily a danger to ourselves and others"? Read full book review >

LITTLE LABORS by Rivka Galchen
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 17, 2016

"A talented writer delivers a miscellany about her maternal transformation."
An engaging mind offers reflections on being a mother, being a writer, and having a baby. Read full book review >
Revising Genesis by James Quatro
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"An accessible, but serious new contribution to biblical studies."
A debut volume delivers a provocative reconsideration of the book of Genesis in light of modern science. Read full book review >
THE PRESIDENTS AND THE CONSTITUTION by Ken Gormley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 10, 2016

"A useful, educational tome featuring top-drawer contributors—though female scholars are woefully underrepresented."
A fluidly fashioned collection of essays about how the roster of American presidents shaped the executive duties as defined in the Constitution. Read full book review >

DAVE HILL DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE by Dave Hill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"Hill makes an amiable companion, and if his stories aren't earth-shattering, his unforced humor is worth a few chuckles."
An unassuming and amusing collection of essays that touches lightly on the modest events of a believably undramatic life. Read full book review >
THE GREAT CLOD by Gary Snyder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2016

"Elegant and thoughtful, with much to read between the lines in commentary on a long life's work. Students and admirers of Snyder will be enchanted and intrigued."
The noted poet and essayist returns with a deceptively small book enfolding a lifetime's worth of study. Read full book review >
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 6, 2016

"A comprehensive, erudite narrative that traces the history of a group dedicated to exploring alternative and effective patient care delivery."
A book examines the pioneering evolution of a health care initiative centered on mind-body medicine. Read full book review >
ON FRIENDSHIP by Alexander Nehamas
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 3, 2016

"For those wanting to see how the concept of friendship in Western civilization has evolved since Aristotle, this study offers a useful, if idiosyncratic survey."
This conceptual exploration of friendship sees both the good and the bad. Read full book review >
HOW ENGLISH BECAME ENGLISH by Simon Horobin
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 1, 2016

"A happy mixture of scholarship, clear writing, and humor."
A linguistics scholar glances at the history of the English language and takes on some contentious contemporary issues—from "fewer" and "less" to the relationship between language and social status. Read full book review >
OLD AGE by Michael Kinsley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 26, 2016

"An uneven but ultimately satisfying examination of the importance of 'long years of good health, not long years simply breathing in and out.'"
A short book about aging and baby boomers that mixes memoir and self-help. Read full book review >
REAL ARTISTS HAVE DAY JOBS by Sara Benincasa
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: April 26, 2016

"Raunchy and unabashedly unapologetic, this is useful, take-no-prisoners humor."
Raw and ribald advice for growing up. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >