Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 10)

CLAIMING NOAH by Amanda Ortlepp
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"While the novel handles heavy topics, it does so with a light and compassionate hand."
The questions and ethics surrounding embryo adoption are at the core of Ortlepp's debut novel. Read full book review >
THE PERFECT NEIGHBORS by Sarah Pekkanen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"A Peyton Place with warm hearts."
On the suburban avenue of one of America's 20 safest communities, four women hide secrets beneath work and family. Read full book review >

JONATHAN UNLEASHED by Meg Rosoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"No bones about it, readers of this charmer are in for a real treat."
Jonathan's dogs are having an existential crisis. Or maybe it's just him. Read full book review >
BRIGHTFELLOW by Rikki Ducornet
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"An endless delight at the sentence level but lacking in big-picture propulsion."
A lonely young man poses as a scholar to gain a sense of community. Read full book review >
LET THE DEVIL OUT by Bill Loehfelm
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"What's most admirable about the series and elevates it over the average procedural is the nuanced evolution of a former Staten Island bartender into a New Orleans street cop."
In the fourth Maureen Coughlin book by New Orleans transplant Loehfelm, Coughlin is both licking her wounds from the events of Doing the Devil's Work (2015) and learning to "believe"—a word which represents hope for a city that's disaster prone. Read full book review >

THE WOLF ROAD by Beth  Lewis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"A romp through the frozen woods on the trail of a killer who's also hunting you can be satisfying, but this debut is a rabbit snare that comes up empty time and again."
A girl on the run in a post-apocalyptic wilderness soon realizes that your past can not only haunt you, it can kill you. Read full book review >
THE DREAM LIFE OF ASTRONAUTS by Patrick Ryan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"Ryan highlights the quirks of ordinary life in a place known for the extraordinary in this sharp and funny collection."
In the shadow of the space program, everyday residents of Cape Canaveral and its environs cope with varying levels of domestic strife in these nine stories, set over the past 50 years. Read full book review >
HOW TO SET A FIRE AND WHY by Jesse Ball
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"A brilliant portrayal of a girl who's quite aware of what she's going through."
A troubled adolescent girl dreams of setting fire to the world. Read full book review >
ABSALOM'S DAUGHTERS by Suzanne Feldman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"A searing and magical debut by a monumental new talent."
When Cassie and Judith catch wind that their runaway father is set to inherit a passel of money in far-off Virginia, they take off to claim their share. Read full book review >
ANGELS OF DETROIT by Christopher Hebert
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"An expansive yet intimate tale of the efforts made to save a decaying Detroit."
An ensemble novel set against the backdrop of a ruined and abandoned Detroit. Read full book review >
THE DEVIL'S EVIDENCE by Simon Kurt Unsworth
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"It's less a whodunit than a ripsnorter, with an emphasis on the ripping. Or maybe the snorting."
Thomas Fool, Satan's top crime solver, is back, and, more than ever, you wonder what awful deeds this poor wretch did in life to deserve such a relentlessly dreadful calling. Read full book review >
THE PRISONER OF HELL GATE by Dana I. Wolff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"Wolff has an intriguing premise and something fresh to say with the horror genre, but ideological concerns trump the scares, and the author fails to craft a hero as compelling as her thwarted, vengeful villain."
Typhoid Mary is alive and well off the coast of New York. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >