Graphic Novels & Comic Books Book Reviews (page 5)

I REMEMBER BEIRUT by Zeina Abirached
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"Meandering and experimental but surprisingly evocative. (Graphic memoir. 12 & up)"
Abirached, who grew up in Beirut during the Lebanese civil war, shares childhood memories in this unconventional graphic memoir. Read full book review >
THE RISE OF AURORA WEST by Paul Pope
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Markedly different than its predecessor but a worthy tale nonetheless. (Graphic adventure. 12 & up)"
Before Battling Boy came to slay the monsters of Arcopolis, Aurora West sought out the monsters that terrorized her city and killed her mother. Read full book review >

THE WRENCHIES by Farel Dalrymple
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"Morbid and discomfiting; not for the faint of heart, but what a ride for those who go with the flow. (Graphic science fiction. 15 & up)"
Children must fight a complicated evil in this dark, disturbing sci-fi tale. Read full book review >
SUGAR SKULL by Charles Burns
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"A fittingly audacious finale to an artistically ambitious trilogy, one that pays homage to the comic books of old yet takes the art to another, weirder level."
The third volume in a trilogy concludes a renowned graphic artist's hallucinatory descent into comic-book hell—and it doesn't end prettily. Read full book review >
KILL MY MOTHER by Jules Feiffer
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Aug. 25, 2014

"An unusual, unforgettable, incomparable pulpy punch."
Award-winning cartoonist/illustrator/author/playwright Feiffer (Backing into Forward, 2010, etc.) delivers his first graphic novel, a sprawling, kinetic noir of giant women, jumbled identities and warped relations. Read full book review >

The Sword and The Butterfly by Matthias Wolf
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: July 31, 2014

"A fantastical graphic novel with superlative artwork and inventive plot devices that's somewhat marred by inadequate characterization."
Writer Wolf (Unbeatable: Hotter than Hell, 2010, etc.), debut illustrator Jimenez, and debut colorist Cabelléingeniously combine Arthurian legend and epic space opera in a new graphic novel. Read full book review >
LENA FINKLE'S MAGIC BARREL by Anya Ulinich
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 29, 2014

"An entertaining intellect wrapped in ill-fitting clothes."
Ulinich (Petropolis, 2007) follows her debut with a graphic novel chronicling a young immigrant writer's adventures through family, friendship and sex. Read full book review >
THROUGH THE WOODS by Emily Carroll
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 15, 2014

"A sure winner for any reader with a yen to become permanently terrified. Brilliant. (Graphic horror. 13-18)"
A print and Web comics artist offers five creep-out chillers (four new) with folk-tale motifs and thoroughly disquieting art. Read full book review >
THE SHADOW HERO by Gene Luen Yang
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: July 15, 2014

"An entertaining and intelligent response to classic superhero stories. (author's note, original comic) (Graphic adventure. 12 & up)"
A golden-age comic superhero returns with a brand-new Asian-American origin story. Read full book review >
GIRLS STANDING ON LAWNS by Daniel Handler
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: May 6, 2014

"Terrific appetizer for discussion. (Poetry. 8 & up)"
This trim, clothbound first in a series from Kalman and Handler for the Museum of Modern Art offers an intriguing painting-and-prose response to a selection of photographs of, as the title indicates, girls and young women standing on lawns. Read full book review >
THIS ONE SUMMER by Mariko Tamaki
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 6, 2014

"Keenly observed and gorgeously illustrated—a triumph. (Graphic novel. 13 & up)"
A summer of family drama, secrets and change in a small beach town. Read full book review >
EERIE DEARIES by Rebecca Chaperon
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2014

"Of doubtful utility as an idea book for young slackers but sure to draw a few chuckles from the teen leather-and-lip-ring set—and grown-ups who often find themselves writing or receiving parental notes to the teacher. (Picture book. 12 & up)"
An alphabet of excuses, from "A is for ASTRAL PROJECTION" to "Z is for ZOMBIE APOCALPYSE," channels the gothic spirit of Edward Gorey. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >