History Book Reviews (page 936)

HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A somber but illuminating reminder of the perniciousness of prejudice—and of the terrible toll it exacts. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
A harrowing recounting of a shameful chapter in American history. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Flawed by Levine's endless snarling and a sometime sluggish style—but undeniably the real nitty-gritty at its core. (Eight- page b&w photo insert—not seen)"
Former DEA agent Levine's account of his South American sting operation to capture major cocaine traffickers—a sting, he claims, that was sabotaged by the CIA. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A fine addition to WW I literature."
A real curiosity: a highly mannered WW I diary, published nearly 80 years after being written and 20 years after its author's death. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A painstaking record of atrocities, the will to survive no matter what, and the price paid for that survival."
Twenty-two powerful stories, recorded by Marks (a family- therapy columnist for Parents magazine), of Jewish men and women who hid from the Nazis as children—and of how this experience shaped their later lives. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Urbane and intelligent: a useful analysis of a rapidly changing phenomenon."
A timely look at nationalism, a phenomenon more often noted than analyzed, by Pfaff (Barbarian Sentiments, 1989, etc.), longtime political commentator for The New Yorker, The International Herald Tribune, and The Los Angeles Times. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A frisky if cautionary saga of political decline and fall, as well as a diverting backstairs tour related by a perceptive and irreverent conservative."
Podhoretz the Younger—former White House apparatchik, son of Norman, and debut author—sheds some harsh light on the Executive Branch and, with some heat and a lot of wit, explains just what George Bush and other inquiring minds would like to know: what changed and how the Bushes lost the key to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Read full book review >
MAUD GONNE by Margaret Ward
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A vivid if airbrushed narrative of a glamorous activist whose story begs for Hollywood treatment. (Sixteen pages of b&w photos- -not seen) (For more of Gonne, see The Gonne-Yeats Letters 1893- 1938, 1992, ed. by Anna MacBride White & A. Norman Jeffares.)"
A warmly sympathetic biography of ``Ireland's Joan of Arc'': Maud Gonne (1866-1953), the agitator and legendary beauty best known today as the muse of William Butler Yeats and mother of Nobel Peace Prize winner Sean MacBride. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Stronger as biography than as feminist cultural history—and it's too bad that this book (published in England in 1992) wasn't updated to include Britain's new female Secret Service chief at work—at her desk. (Sixteen b&w illustrations)"
While ``Mata Hari'' remains synonymous with the femme fatale trading her body for secrets, this readable biography of the original—the Dutch-born exotic dancer executed by the French in 1917 for espionage—argues that she was framed and challenges the whole notion of women agents as sex workers. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Rambling and repetitive polemic that could have something important to say but by substituting assertion and anecdote for rigorous analysis, doesn't. (Illustrations—not seen)"
Here, Enloe (Government/Clark University) makes bold but often unsubstantiated assertions about the relationship between sexuality and militarism—as she seeks, not too persuasively, to chart changing post-cold-war sexual politics. Read full book review >
BERIA by Amy Knight
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"In avoiding sensationalism or unbridled psychological speculation, Knight forgoes a full apprehension of the pathology of Beria and the system that bred him—without which many may choose not to endure the man's odious company. (Illustrations)"
Scrupulous academic account that ultimately fails to do full justice to the chilling fascination of its subject. Read full book review >
ASSASSINATION IN KHARTOUM by David A. Korn
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Korn apparently wanted to write a hymn to virtue and patriotism—but his song seems old-fashioned, a tune from another era. (Photographs and maps)"
Former Foreign Service officer Korn's account of the 1973 killing in Sudan of American diplomats Cleo Noel and George Moore by the radical Palestinian Black September movement. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Dramatic, frequently affectionate, takes on fractious rebel warriors whose success has yet to yield them the victory they thought they'd won by nine years of bloody battle. (Foreword by Dan Rather; maps and eight pages of photographs—not seen)"
A principal virtue of TV-journalist Lohbeck's vivid account of his lengthy sojourn in Afghan combat zones is the light it sheds on the mujahideen groups that—despite various political/religious agendas, internecine rivalries, and fitful aid from Western allies- -managed to drive Soviet troops from their mountainous, hostile homeland. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frances Stroh
author of BEER MONEY
May 4, 2016

Frances Stroh’s earliest memories are ones of great privilege: shopping trips to London and New York, lunches served by black-tied waiters at the Regency Hotel, and a house filled with precious antiques, which she was forbidden to touch. Established in Detroit in 1850, by 1984 the Stroh Brewing Company had become the largest private beer fortune in America and a brand emblematic of the American dream itself; while Stroh was coming of age, the Stroh family fortune was estimated to be worth $700 million. But behind the beautiful façade lay a crumbling foundation. As their fortune dissolved in little over a decade, the family was torn apart internally by divorce and one family member's drug bust; disagreements over the management of the business; and disputes over the remaining money they possessed. “The author’s family might have successfully burned through a massive fortune, but they squandered a lot more than that,” our reviewer writes about Stroh’s debut memoir, Beer Money. “A sorrowful, eye-opening examination of familial dysfunction.” View video >