It's Just So by Brenda Faatz
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"An anarchic romp for kids who enjoy suspending logic and reason during their school day."
A rhyming, read-aloud debut children's book that tracks the mercurial adventures of a young girl during her first day at a new school. Read full book review >
We've Been Thinking... and It Works by Steve Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE

"The ideas in this earnest but sometimes-muzzy work are hit-and-miss, but the visuals are vibrant."
Homeless people struggling to build a community ponder themselves and society in this photographic meditation, the second installment of Wilson's (The Success of Failure, 2012, etc.) American Street Philosophers series.Read full book review >

The Book of Sonny by Bob Laurie
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 2016

"A heartfelt story of a broken family beginning to heal."
A badly fractured family suddenly faces a crisis in Laurie's debut novel. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2015

"A prescient memoir about one woman's emotional triumph over war and religious persecution."
Debut author Softic shares her family's moving ordeal in war-torn Bosnia-Herzegovina in a meditation on the sustaining power of faith. Read full book review >
Hit Out by Darren Musial
FICTION & LITERATURE

"An enjoyable Chicago detective story starring an eight-ball-playing protagonist."
Musial (Break Shot, 2015) returns with another Max Deacon mystery in this novel of crime and pool.Read full book review >

Who Am I? by Megan Cyrulewski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 17, 2014

"While providing some insights into mental illness and abuse, this work becomes too mired in the maneuvers of a father to engage a broad readership."
A debut memoir offers a straightforward account of an emotionally abusive marriage. Read full book review >
The Other Woman by Abigail Van Alyn
FICTION & LITERATURE

"A slow-paced but tense story with enough urgency to keep the pages turning."
This debut novel revolves around an alpha-male psychiatrist with an Ivy League pedigree and two female patients who set out to learn potentially dangerous truths about him. Read full book review >
Mystery on Mount Dusk by Aleah Taylor
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Sept. 25, 2015

"Readers should gladly follow this tale's young hero, whether he's facing evil spells or a typical childhood."
In this debut YA fantasy, a 10-year-old boy learns that the secret of his new hometown lies with the strange disappearances of two families centuries ago. Read full book review >
The Burden of Sweetberry by Carol Gosa-Summerville
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 26, 2016

"A stirring tale rooted in the language and experience of the Alabama community it depicts."
In this debut historical novel, a Southern African-American enclave struggles with a public tragedy. Read full book review >
Sacred Prayers to God by Mick Pollitt
RELIGION
Released: March 30, 2016

"A prayer journal that lacks polish and an effective presentation."
Pollitt offers 500 prayers to God in this Christian volume. Read full book review >
Tearing Down The Statues by Brian Bennudriti
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"Rococo worldbuilding and sci-fi fantasy for the adventurous reader, relayed in language and description bordering on the experimental."
As an incredible realm sinks deeper and deeper into anarchy and warfare, a strange group of pilgrims embarks on an enigmatic mission. Read full book review >
The University of Berkshire Hathaway by Daniel Pecaut
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

"A rare view into the mind of Warren Buffett."
A record of 30 years of holding company Berkshire Hathaway's annual meetings, replete with insight into the minds of the company's leaders. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >