Nature & Travel Book Reviews (page 5)

THE GREAT CLOD by Gary Snyder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 8, 2016

"Elegant and thoughtful, with much to read between the lines in commentary on a long life's work. Students and admirers of Snyder will be enchanted and intrigued."
The noted poet and essayist returns with a deceptively small book enfolding a lifetime's worth of study. Read full book review >
RUN, SPOT, RUN by Jessica Pierce
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 6, 2016

"A thoughtful book that should spark debate, with the author stressing that bringing a companion animal into one's life is an ethical commitment that should not to be taken lightly."
Examination of the pros and cons of pet ownership from the standpoint of ethics. Read full book review >

MEMORIES by Teffi
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2016

"Fluently translated by several hands and introduced by Teffi's biographer, Edythe Haber, these are priceless anecdotes and beautiful portraits of friends and acquaintances lost forever."
Poignant reflections of a beloved Russian humorist as she fled her homeland on the eve of Bolshevik victory. Read full book review >
WHITE SANDS by Geoff Dyer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A mesmerizing compendium that reflects on time, place, and just what, exactly, we are doing here."
In a slender volume that contains multitudes, the award-winning critic and novelist details his travels in such far-flung places as Tahiti and the Arctic Circle. Read full book review >
CHAMPAGNE BABY by Laure Dugas
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A Frenchwoman entertainingly reflects on what she learned about herself, her family's wine business, and wines in general while living in the U.S."
How one Frenchwoman's stint in New York City helped her find her roots. Read full book review >

PINPOINT by Greg Milner
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: May 3, 2016

"Milner has done his homework, assuring readers will be satisfied, educated, and occasionally amazed."
What universal digital service is essential to the world's infrastructure and our daily lives? Yes, the Internet, but more fundamentally, the Global Positioning System. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"It's no Young Men and Fire, but Santos provides a good summary of terrible events and their aftermath."
New York Times Phoenix bureau chief Santos looks into a lightning-caused blaze that killed 19 Arizona firefighters in the summer of 2013. Read full book review >
THE DOG MERCHANTS by Kim Kavin
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 2, 2016

"A scathing indictment of an industry run amok; belongs on every pet lover's bookshelf."
A hard-hitting exploration of the idea of "dogs as a product." Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2016

"A spirited look at the business and impact of delivering mail."
How America got mail. Read full book review >
FOLLOWING THE WILD BEES by Thomas D. Seeley
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: April 26, 2016

"Motivated readers may well find themselves setting aside sunny weekends to go tromping in the goldenrod, hoping to 'engage the most intelligent insect in the world.'"
A honeybee behaviorist takes a break from hard science to introduce the sport of bee hunting. Read full book review >
THIRST FOR POWER by Michael E. Webber
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: April 26, 2016

"A wide-ranging, nuanced view of difficult but important issues that require serious consideration at every level, from policymakers, opinion shapers, and educators down to everyday citizens."
An exploration of the link between impending global water and power shortages. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 26, 2016

"Well written and full of firsthand insight—a good companion to weightier studies such as Timothy Miller's The 60s Communes (1999) and Arthur Kopecky's Leaving New Buffalo Commune (2006)."
If you can remember the '60s, you may have been there—but as a very young person, as this thoughtful history reveals. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >