Religion Book Reviews (page 4)

RELIGION
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing new angle on the well-worn field of 'historical Jesus' studies."
Understanding the role of memory in the formation of the Christian Gospels. Read full book review >
APOSTLE by Tom Bissell
HISTORY
Released: March 1, 2016

"A rich, contentious, and challenging book."
A deep dive into the heart of the New Testament, crossing continents and cross-referencing texts. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Impressively vast in scope and content, Ostler's work is most accessible to fellow specialists but should intrigue dedicated readers as well."
The effects of religion on language are well-known; what about the effects of language on religion? Read full book review >
PUTTING GOD SECOND by Donniel Hartman
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A stimulating and sure-to-be discussed critique of monotheism."
Why, asks Hartman (The Boundaries of Judaism, 2007, etc.), do so many religious groups and individuals fail to live up to the standards of their faith traditions? Read full book review >
STRANGE GODS by Susan Jacoby
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Jacoby draws the first detailed maps of a terrain that has been very much in need of intelligent, careful cartography."
In a work blending culture, religion, history, biography, and a bit of memoir (with more than a soupcon of attitude), the author of The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought (2013, etc.) returns with a revealing historical analysis of religious conversions.Read full book review >

RELIGION
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"The book shows some promise, but much of it is largely unnecessary and sensationalist."
A critical look at what many people think is in the Bible. Read full book review >
REVELATION by Dennis Covington
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"Far from uninteresting but too often self-indulgent and unsatisfying."
A search for faith amid war, terror, and family strife. Read full book review >
The Voice of Creation by J. Hudson Mitchell
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 16, 2016

"A worthy, concise introduction to creationism."
A debut book offers a philosophically charged argument for literal Creationism, in particular, and Christianity. Read full book review >
THE SUPER NATURAL by Jeffrey J. Kripal
RELIGION
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"A thought-provoking, intelligent reconceptualization of supernatural events."
A religious historian and a popular fiction writer and mystic collaborate to adopt unexplained phenomena into the realm of natural occurrences. Read full book review >
STOLEN WORDS by Mark Glickman
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"The text is approachable and the material is invaluable. The written word prevails."
The odyssey of Jewish books in the wake of the Holocaust. Read full book review >
The Journey of a Spiritual Traveler by Michael Kurtz
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 25, 2016

"A set of philosophical but accessible ruminations on Christian life."
A series of meditative essays on the joys and challenges of a spiritual life. Read full book review >
Understanding God's Contracts with Mankind by J. William Howerton
RELIGION
Released: Jan. 21, 2016

"A solid, brief introduction to Christian doctrine that should appeal to the like-minded."
A debut book offers a defense of Christian belief in the midst of an increasingly secular age. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >