Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews (page 4)

TRIPLE MOON by Melissa de la Cruz
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A stormy beach read that is more soap than opera. (Paranormal romance. 14 & up)"
Terrible teen witches seek and sabotage safe haven in this spinoff's spinoff. Read full book review >
UNFORGIVEN by Lauren Kate
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"Engaging enough to keep Kate's legions of fans happy. (Paranormal romance. 12-18)"
The long-standing Fallen series continues with bad boy fallen angel Cam trying to win back his lost love from ancient Israel, entering into a deal with the devil to do it. Read full book review >

In Absence of Fear by Celeste Chaney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 2015

"A compelling novel to tease readers' paranoia."
Chaney imagines a society under total surveillance in this debut sci-fi thriller. Read full book review >
Lancelot: Her Story by Carol Anne Douglas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 4, 2015

"Provides a distinctly fresh, if slow-moving, take on Camelot."
In this retelling of the Arthurian legend, Lancelot becomes a woman disguised as a man, and Guinevere longs to rule the realm. Read full book review >
THE CONJURER'S RIDDLE by Andrea Cremer
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A suitably swashbuckling sequel. (Steampunk. 12 & up)"
The sequel to The Inventor's Secret (2014) finds plucky Resistance warrior Charlotte leading her small but trusty band of youthful rebels through the thickets and swamps of the New York Wildlands in a desperate bid to reach French-held rebel territory near a fictional New Orleans. Read full book review >

HOLLOWGIRL by Sean Williams
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A philosophical marathon. (Science fiction. 12 & up)"
The conclusion of the teleportation-based science-fiction Twinmaker trilogy. Read full book review >
AIR AND DARKNESS by David Drake
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Should satisfy series regulars. Just about."
Final installment of the four-volume fantasy cycle (Monsters of the Earth, 2013, etc.) featuring another existential threat to Carce, Drake's analogue of Rome circa 30 C.E.Read full book review >
SOLAR EXPRESS by L.E. Modesitt Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"For fans only."
Prolific author Modesitt returns to science fiction with a tale of space exploration. Read full book review >
MYSTIC by Jason Denzel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"The best that one can say of this hackneyed, amateurish effort is that it lacks the bloat of many of its compatriots and is soon over."
The founder of a popular fan website for the bestselling Wheel of Time fantasy series takes his own stab at the genre. Read full book review >
WEIGHING SHADOWS by Lisa Goldstein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Lovely, disturbing, and intriguing in spots but ultimately, just not enough."
Goldstein takes a break from fantasy (The Uncertain Places, 2011, etc.) and returns to science fiction with this brief tale of a corporation seeking to diminish the role of women in society by altering the timeline.Read full book review >
MADE TO KILL by Adam Christopher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A small idea stretched until it snaps."
Raymond Chandler meets Astounding in this pulpy, hard-boiled detective pastiche, the first of a trilogy by the author of The Empire State and The Spider Wars series (The Machine Awakes, 2015, etc.).Read full book review >
Forget Tomorrow by Pintip Dunn
CHILDREN'S AND TEEN
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"A YA adventure with ethereal prose and appealing characters."
In Dunn's YA sci-fi debut, set in a world where people can see glimpses of future events, one teenager sees a vision of herself killing her little sister. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >