Science & Technology Book Reviews

A New Light on the Expanding Universe by Les Hardison
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 5, 2010

"A dense, technical, but well-written argument for a new scientific interpretation."
A contrarian approach to understanding some fundamental concepts in physics. Read full book review >
More Light on the Expanding Universe by Les Hardison
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 8, 2016

"More about a new theory of physics that challenges accepted science regarding the building blocks of the universe."
A further exploration of a theory of physics that reinterprets light through a new paradigm. Read full book review >

Revising Genesis by James Quatro
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: May 13, 2016

"An accessible, but serious new contribution to biblical studies."
A debut volume delivers a provocative reconsideration of the book of Genesis in light of modern science. Read full book review >
VENOMOUS by Christie Wilcox
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"Wilcox writes in a lively style, but the book is likely of greatest interest to those already drawn to the subject."
How the creatures that embody some of mankind's deepest fears use toxic substances to defend themselves against predators and to prey on the creatures they eat—and why this is important to us today. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: March 4, 2016

"A coherent, comprehensive exploration of evolution, genetics, and what it means to be human."
A neuroscientist looks at evolution and the future of Homo sapiens.Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"Solid, easily assimilated evidence showing how microbes are an integral part of a child's healthy life."
Why dirt and microbes are good for your child. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A charming natural history of eclipses and a guide to witnessing the awe-inspiring event yourself."
Solar and lunar eclipses have played an integral role in unlocking some of the biggest mysteries of the universe and are now revered for their celestial beauty; but for our ancestors, eclipses were seen as portending doom. Read full book review >
THE GRID by Gretchen Bakke
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: July 12, 2016

"A lively analysis of the challenges renewables present to the production and distribution of electricity."
A primer on the challenges facing a power industry in transition. Read full book review >
BIG DATA by Timandra Harkness
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A readable guide for the non-IT set."
A pleasing excursion into the daunting terrain of computer-driven information. Read full book review >
SEVEN SKELETONS by Lydia Pyne
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 16, 2016

"Ian Tattersall's The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack (2015) remains the best popular modern history of human evolution, but Pyne casts her net more widely, adding captivating accounts of how each discovery fascinated the mass media and entered literature and popular culture."
Describing human evolution through accounts of fossils that became media events might seem a publicity ploy, but science journalist Pyne (Institute for Historical Studies/Univ. of Texas; Bookshelf, 2016, etc.) pulls it off. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: July 12, 2016

"A book in which the author's fascinating, well-researched ideas regarding holistic health may presage a paradigm shift in medicine."
Fully 90 percent of human cells are microbial. This astonishing fact means that we are not merely human but a superorganism whose "microbiome" plays a major role in health and disease. Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A highly thoughtful and entertaining treatment of a subject that merits serious consideration."
An internationally recognized leader in the field of childhood learning debunks the concept of "good parenting." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >