Social Sciences Book Reviews (page 2)

NAVIGATING LIFE by Margaux Bergen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Bergen's more helpful suggestions about ways to live well would be better suited to a mother-to-daughter letter, with all of the straining to impress shorn away."
A guide to life started by a mother when her daughter was in elementary school and given to her on her first day of college. Read full book review >
RAMPAGE NATION by Louis Klarevas
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 23, 2016

"A deeply researched, clearly written study that educates while it horrifies."
Klarevas (Global Affairs/Univ. of Massachusetts-Boston) shares his research showing that mass shootings are more common than widely believed but can be decreased by addressing the conditions common to all the massacres. Read full book review >

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Aug. 9, 2016

"A highly thoughtful and entertaining treatment of a subject that merits serious consideration."
An internationally recognized leader in the field of childhood learning debunks the concept of "good parenting." Read full book review >
INVISIBLE MAN, GOT THE WHOLE WORLD WATCHING by Mychal Denzel Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 14, 2016

"Realizing that he has more questions than answers, Smith cautiously sketches a useful blueprint for radical and intersectional politics in a country where a black child can grow up to be president but where living while black is still dangerous."
As black men are cut down by the police and self-appointed vigilantes, an activist wrestles with competing claims—from his family and community, his historically black university, the media, and white America—on his blackness and how it is to be lived. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 12, 2016

"A lengthy manifesto for AMCAP that lays out a vision for an ascendant black America."
Rempson (Minority Access to Higher Education In N.Y. City, 1972) examines what he sees as the root causes of education and economic-mobility gaps that affect African-American males.Read full book review >

POLARIZED by James E. Campbell
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 1, 2016

"A painstakingly methodical, exhausting process to conclude that there is really nothing to worry about."
A study of an American public grown more ideologically conflicted since the 1960s and why—or whether—it matters. Read full book review >
A BOOK ABOUT LOVE by Jonah Lehrer
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: July 12, 2016

"While the book adequately covers a good deal of research and systematically examines the rewards and challenges of intimacy, it doesn't make love sound like a whole lot of fun."
Journalist Lehrer addresses the power of human attachment. Read full book review >
Tao of Sustainability by Gregory Ripley
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Jan. 1, 2016

"An informative, well-presented application of traditional activities and philosophies to modern-day life."
Ripley (Primal Energy, 2014, etc.) offers a path back to nature in this philosophical work.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 5, 2016

"A culturally rich and rewarding personal chronicle of ethnic faith and intermingled tradition."
A heartfelt memoir plumbs the multilayered experience of being Muslim in America. Read full book review >
THE FIRE THIS TIME by Jesmyn Ward
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"Timely contributions to an urgent national conversation."
Poets, scholars, and essayists reflect on race in America. Read full book review >
THIS IS WHERE YOU BELONG by Melody Warnick
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: June 21, 2016

"Well intended but unsatisfying."
Don't like where you live? Socialize. Volunteer. Make lists. Or you could just move. Read full book review >
THE GREAT ACCELERATION by Robert Colvile
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 1, 2016

"A familiar argument but with interesting twists and a rosier forecast than many other books of social/technological criticism."
A well-paced consideration of the effects of technology on lives made ever busier by it—and whipping by in a whirlwind as a result. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >