Social Sciences Book Reviews

THE FULL CATASTROPHE by James Angelos
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 2, 2015

"A candid, unsparing look at the challenges Greece has yet to overcome."
Endemic problems plague a proud country. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: June 9, 2015

"A provocative discussion of how public investment and private entrepreneurship can combine to shape future advantages from existing used and unused capacities."
Drawing on her business success, Internet entrepreneur and internationally respected transport expert Chase details how digital infrastructure can be used to organize excess capacity and generate profit in service businesses. Read full book review >

AN UNLIKELY UNION by Paul Moses
HISTORY
Released: July 3, 2015

"A brisk, well-researched look at a significant part of New York's boisterous past."
How two ethnic groups made peace. Read full book review >
NAKED AT LUNCH by Mark Haskell Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 2, 2015

"A thoughtful and entertaining analysis of why so many still want to ditch their clothes and let it all hang out."
An open-minded writer drops his skivvies at various locations around the world in an amusing and earnest attempt to understand the appeal of nudism. Read full book review >
IN SEARCH OF THE MOVEMENT by Benjamin Hedin
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 2015

"Thoughtful essays on this significant struggle, ongoing and continuous."
A journalistic foray into the work of unsung heroes in the civil rights struggle, then and now. Read full book review >

MISBEHAVING by Richard H. Thaler
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: May 18, 2015

"Readers with even the remotest interest in how the world really works will enjoy this work of the dismal science pleasingly, and even exuberantly, done."
The dean of behavioral economics—the study of how people behave in practice rather than in theory when it comes to dollars and cents—gives a spry account of his field. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 9, 2015

"A potent introduction to a nearly forgotten part of the civil rights movement and a personalized reminder of what it was truly about."
A powerful memoir of the civil rights movement, specifically the dramatic struggle to integrate the schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia. Read full book review >
THE GREAT DIVIDE by Joseph E. Stiglitz
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 20, 2015

"Smart, sometimes-stinging prose that rejects the doctrines of strangled government and artificial austerity, doctrines that require us to 'pay a high economic price for our growing inequality and declining opportunity.'"
Nobel Prize-winning economist Stiglitz (The Price of Inequality, 2012, etc.) examines some of the macro dollars-and-cents issues that separate the haves from the have-nots—and money is just of them. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: June 9, 2025

"Well-presented, solid facts that address the many detriments of helicopter parenting."
Why helicopter parents are doing more harm than good to their children. Read full book review >
THE HILLARY DOCTRINE by Valerie M. Hudson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 30, 2015

"A sound study that carries an urgent message."
A compelling argument for women's rights. Read full book review >
DISSENT by Ralph Young
HISTORY
Released: May 1, 2015

"Refreshingly democratic—solid supplemental reading to the likes of Terkel and Alinsky, insistent on upholding the rights of political minorities even when they're wrong."
A broad-ranging, evenhanded view of a tradition honed into an art form in America: the use of dissent as "a critique of governance." Read full book review >
EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED by Jillian Lauren
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 5, 2015

"Lauren's writing is brave and honest, and she calls out hypocrisy wherever she sees it and shines a light on the challenges faced during the adoption process."
Exploring how we see identity through the process of adoption. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >