Thrillers Book Reviews (page 2)

Trading Salvos by Holly A. Bell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 11, 2016

"Bell's protagonist holds her own in her first outing and will surely be ready for more harrowing circumstances in a potential sequel."
A woman running a CIA safe house in Alaska garners unwelcome attention while trying to decipher a program written by her late software-engineer husband in this debut thriller. Read full book review >
INK AND BONE by Lisa Unger
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Unger's beloved characters (Crazy Love You, 2015, etc.) continue a deftly balanced story that's supernatural without a creepy aftertaste."
A girl with the gift of seeing the spirit world tries to harness her ability while working with a private detective who isn't a believer. Read full book review >

THE FAR EMPTY by J. Todd Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"The journey to the end is almost as taxing as that faced by the book's put-upon migrants."
The discovery of a body on the Tex-Mex border fuels a teenager's suspicions about his father, the local sheriff, in this debut thriller by a longtime Drug Enforcement Administration agent. Read full book review >
THE SECOND GIRL by David Swinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"An auspicious, and gleefully amoral, series debut."
Old habits die hard, and sometimes cause collateral damage, in this character-driven crime story. Read full book review >
SECURITY by Gina Wohlsdorf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"This horror story with a humorous edge casts video surveillance as both hero and villain and raises plentiful goose bumps as a result."
A camera's-eye view shows more than we may be prepared to see in this innovative thriller. Read full book review >

STEALING PEOPLE by Robert Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Wilson has created a great character whose emotional trials are exciting to follow. This series looks like it will have legs if the hero can stand any more emotional pummeling."
The third in a series featuring British kidnap consultant Charlie Boxer (You Will Never Find Me, 2015, etc.). Read full book review >
THE CORNERS OF THE GLOBE by Robert Goddard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"A sophisticated spy story with serious historical chops that might serve as an interesting companion to Adam Tooze's WWI history, The Deluge (2014)."
The second entry in a spy trilogy set at the end of World War I. Read full book review >
THE GIRLS IN THE GARDEN by Lisa Jewell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Jewell offers an intriguing premise and characters but has difficulty maintaining plot momentum and creating depth of character."
Mysterious, life-threatening injuries to a teenage girl cause previously close-knit neighborhood families to examine each other with concern and suspicion. Read full book review >
HELL'S GATE by Bill Schutt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2016

"Fast-moving fun for thriller readers who enjoy a bit of horror and seeing bad guys get what's coming to them."
A World War II thriller with plenty of action and suspense in a most unusual setting. Read full book review >
Daddy Dearest by Paul Southern
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2016

"An enthralling tale, but the genuine mystery involves the protagonist, a spellbinding enigma from beginning to end."
A divorcé's 5-year-old daughter vanishes during a weekend visit, turning his apartment neighbors into suspects in Southern's (Killing Sound, 2014, etc.) thriller. Read full book review >
A HERO OF FRANCE by Alan Furst
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 2016

"This daydream of life under the Occupation is something rare: a suspense novel that offers the pleasures of relaxation."
A Resistance leader in Nazi-occupied France attempts to keep his lines of escape open in this lyrical spy novel. Read full book review >
American for Sale by Chuck Van Soye
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 26, 2016

"An optimistic adventure set against the ugliness of modern warfare in Syria."
A CIA-trained family man must escape the clutches of Middle Eastern extremists in this sequel to Spy Mates (2013).Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >