True Crime Book Reviews (page 2)

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A vivid, compelling account of a life on the edge."
The mother of the 18-year-old killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014 relates the saga of her life in the St. Louis suburb, expressing her love for her children on nearly every page. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 9, 2016

"Those whose politics differ from Hinton's will likely be inclined to quarrel with her diagnosis, but they'll be obliged to grapple with her fact-filled, scholarly argument."
A Harvard historian examines the origins of "the foremost civil rights issue of our time." Read full book review >

THE COOK UP by D. Watkins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A familiar story to fans of The Wire, but Watkins provides a gritty, vivid first-person document of a desperate demographic."
A memoir of growing up and selling drugs on East Baltimore's bloody corners. Read full book review >
MISSING MAN by Barry Meier
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A chilling real-world espionage yarn."
The unsettling tale of Bob Levinson, a private investigator gone missing in Iran. Read full book review >
THE HUNT FOR MAAN SINGH by Hipólito Acosta
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 30, 2016

"Certainly flawed but moderately informative and entertaining."
The account of two Immigration and Naturalization Service officers who helped bring down a human trafficking operation that spanned the globe. Read full book review >

SNATCHED by Bruce Porter
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2016

"An engaging, improbable true-crime tale that underscores the grandiose futility of the drug war."
Pulpy account of a glamorous narcotrafficker ensnared by her past. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 12, 2016

"A great subject overwhelmed by legal minutiae."
Who was the clever thief who snatched Goya's portrait of the Duke of Wellington from the National Gallery in London in 1961? Read full book review >
INFAMY by Lydia Cacho
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 12, 2016

"An important record of the incremental steps one journalist took against sexual violence in Mexico."
A Mexican journalist bravely sets precedent in the highest court in targeting corruption and influence pedaling. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 11, 2016

"Victorian murder mysteries are usually entertaining. Even without a Sherlock, this highly readable story still shows the cleverness of the police and the frustrations of prosecutors."
Murphy (Interdisciplinary Writing/Univ. of Colorado; Shooting Victoria: Madness, Mayhem, and the Rebirth of the British Monarchy, 2013) exposes the inequities of British justice in the 1871 case of Jane Clouson, who was "found attacked and horribly disfigured on a quiet country lane outside of Greenwich."Read full book review >
REDEEMABLE by Erwin James
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A brutally candid but always humane memoir of redemption."
A convicted murderer-turned-journalist tells the story of how he became a criminal but then underwent major personal rehabilitation while serving time in prison. Read full book review >
A BURGLAR'S GUIDE TO THE CITY by Geoff Manaugh
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Manaugh's authoritative writing wields a descriptive elegance, but while much in the book seems self-evident, he goes to great lengths to define it, and now and then, this laboring of the obvious results in unnecessary padding."
Manaugh (The BLDGBLOG Book, 2009) melds a romantic's taste for the furtive with the nitty-gritty of subverting architectural design in this fascinating, occasionally overfurnished examination of the art and science of burglary.Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 5, 2016

"Not entirely satisfying but an engaging true-crime tale nonetheless."
The true story of a serial killer in 1880s Austin, Texas. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Swan Huntley
June 27, 2016

In Swan Huntley’s debut novel We Could Be Beautiful, Catherine West has spent her entire life surrounded by beautiful things. She owns an immaculate Manhattan apartment, she collects fine art, she buys exquisite handbags and clothing, and she constantly redecorates her home. And yet, despite all this, she still feels empty. One night, at an art opening, Catherine meets William Stockton, a handsome man who shares her impeccable taste and love of beauty. He is educated, elegant, and even has a personal connection—his parents and Catherine's parents were friends years ago. But as he and Catherine grow closer, she begins to encounter strange signs, and her mother, Elizabeth (now suffering from Alzheimer’s), seems to have only bad memories of William as a boy. In Elizabeth’s old diary she finds an unnerving letter from a former nanny that cryptically reads: “We cannot trust anyone . . . “ Is William lying about his past? “Huntley’s debut stands out not for its thrills but rather for her hawkish eye for social detail and razor-sharp wit,” our reviewer writes. “An intoxicating escape; as smart as it is fun.” View video >