Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1750)

THE WICKED WINTER by Kate Sedley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 1999

"Best in the series to date."
Sixth in a series set in medieval England and relating the adventures of Roger, a chapman (traveling peddler) living in Bristol—a widower with an infant child cared for by his mother-in-law when he's on the road. Read full book review >
MY FATHER, DANCING by Bliss Broyard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 1999

"All eyes should be open, looking for more."
The daughter of the late critic and longtime New York Times reviewer Anatole Broyard debuts with eight stories that break little new ground but are readable, well-crafted, entirely unaffected—and consequently of considerable appeal. Read full book review >

GIFTS by Nuruddin Farah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

Gifts ($23.95; Aug.; 256 pp.; 1-55970-484-5). Read full book review >
THE WILD CHILD by Mary Jo Putney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"The working-out of family and emotional problems doesn—t seem enough to give this story needed spice, and the sudden, melodramatic addition of a villain is a bit slapdash."
Twins seem to be the newest romance fashion. Read full book review >
A CERTAIN AGE by Tama Janowitz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"While Florence's declining fortunes in a crass city are well described, her failure to achieve any wisdom about her life makes it hard to sympathize with her misfortunes."
Vaguely matured author Janowitz (By the Shores of Gitchee Gumee, 1996, etc.) creates a well-rounded, static character, smartly walks her through New York's social paces, and succeeds in creating a fully adequate novel. Read full book review >

A STRANGER IN THE EARTH by Marcel Theroux
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

Many funny moments and a beguiling cast of bona fide English eccentrics adorn this charming picaresque coming-of-ager - the fictional debut of veteran novelist Paul Theroux's son. Read full book review >
BLUE HOLE by G.D. Gearino
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Will appeal to readers willing to forego action and suspense in order to delve into the psyches of complex and admittedly endearing characters."
Set in small-town Georgia circa 1969, this exercise in leisurely front-porch storytelling from Gearino (What the Deaf-Mute Heard, 1995, etc.) casts its lot with character over action. Read full book review >
THE THIRD BODY by Hélène Cixous
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"The luckless fourth body (the reader's) will probably not remain awake long enough to partake of any subsequent signs of life (there ain't many)."
The Third Body ($24.95; Aug.; 168 pp.; 0-8101-1687-1). Read full book review >
MAPS by Nuruddin Farah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"One of the best novels out of Africa in some time."
Maps ($23.95; Aug.; 272 pp.; 1-55970-485-3): Originally published in 1986, this is the first installment in Farah's abovementioned trilogy (its concluding volume, Secrets, appeared here alone in 1998). Read full book review >
NIGHT OF THE WOLF by Alice Borchardt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Even stronger and deeper than The Silver Wolf."
For her fourth outing, a sequel to the well-received The Silver Wolf (1998), Anne Rice's older sister once again plays to her strengths by drawing readers into the sensibilities of her werewolf protagonists. Read full book review >
SEVEN DREAMS OF ELMIRA by Patrick Chamoiseau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"A minor but charming addition to Chamoiseau's exotic and distinctive oeuvre."
Seven Dreams Of Elmira ($20.00; Aug.; 64 pp.; photographs by Jean-Luc Laguardique; 1-58195-002-0): This quaint and curious little volume combines a number of striking photographs (black and white and color landscapes and portraits) that celebrate the West Indian island of Martinique with a terse prose poem written by that island's most successful literary export: the Creole-born author of such lush, exuberant fictions as Texaco (1997) and Solibo Magnificent (1998). Read full book review >
FLORIDA ROADKILL by Tim Dorsey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1999

"Dorsey's voice is laconic and distinctive. And his management of single scenes is skillful. Structural weaknesses and improbable coincidences aside, then: an amusing beach read."
Hilarious set pieces distinguish this otherwise sluggishly plotted contribution to Sunbelt Baroque, the genre epitomized by Carl Hiaasen and Elmore Leonard. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >