Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1818)

FLORA'S SUITCASE by Dalia Rabinovich
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 1998

"A disappointing if amiable debut."
A first novel, by the winner of the HarperCollins— "Write the Bestseller,— contest tells of a Jewish-Russian-American family transplanted to the unlikely soil of Colombia. Read full book review >
NO PHYSICAL EVIDENCE by Gus Lee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 1998

"Awkward legal melodrama enriched by passionate pleading for the protection of children. (Book-of-the-Month alternate selection)"
Overwritten, overplotted legal procedural, set in a richly atmospheric Chinese-American Sacramento, that makes a compelling point about the challenges involved in investigating and punishing sex criminals. Read full book review >

THE SHAMAN'S GAME by James D. Doss
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Feeble threads of a sad story are laced into an elaborately mystical narrative, but only the most patient of readers, or students of Indian lore, will care enough to ferret them out from what, in all, is a repetitive mass of visions, nightmares, tribal tales, and ancient myths."
The fourth in the legend-infused chronicle set in the hills and canyons of Colorado, where native Charlie Moon is a policeman on the Ute reservation near the village of Ignacio (The Shaman's Bones, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
RULES OF THE WILD by Francesca Marciano
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Idiotic, hackneyed, unbearably pretentious: Marciano's portraits of female vanity and masculine self-absorption would provide the makings of a satire worthy of Waugh—were there even the slightest curl of a smile on her lips. (First printing of 50,000; author tour)"
A debut that takes us into an Africa where—with Marciano as our guide—we are more likely to come upon Bianca Jagger than Nelson Mandela. Read full book review >
THE ANATOMIST by Federico Andahazi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

The Anatomist ($22.95; Sept. 1998; 256 pp.; 0-385-49132-8): This much-ballyhooed first novel from Argentina, which is set in a credibly realized 16th-century Venice, sets out to tell the story of physician Mateo Colombo, a bold scientific adventurer (likened, overemphatically, to his namesake Christopher Columbus) who in the course of his researches "discovers" the clitoris—and is promptly imprisoned by outraged Church officials. Read full book review >

THE SAME EMBRACE by Michael Lowenthal
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Nevertheless, as an examination of the deforming effect of a family's secrets, and as a portrait of a young man attempting to rediscover his faith without jettisoning his identity, a fresh and provocative first novel."
A closely observed study of the corrosive effect of a family's long-held secrets and, more particularly, of the struggle of siblings to defuse their anger and find some common ground. Read full book review >
A HOUSE ON THE PIAZZA by Kenny Marotta
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"A delight."
Marotta (a Piece of Earth, 1985) links seven stories and a novella to make up his debut collection—Italian diaspora tales that easily transcend their ethnic theme in time and place. Read full book review >
THE TRIAL by Franz Kafka
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Admirers of Kafka's fiction will not want to miss it."
The Trial($24.00; Sept.; 304 pp.; 0-8052-4165-5): Following closely this year's new version of The Castle, here is another in a series of retranslations based on "restored texts" assembled from Kafka's original manuscripts and notes. Read full book review >
MARY MCGREEVY by Walter Keady
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"The heroine herself, for all her musical laughter and ankle-flashing, remains something of a cipher as well."
A freethinking woman turns a rural community in the west of Ireland on its head, in this quaint but unremarkable tale by Keady (Celibates and Other Lovers, not reviewed). Read full book review >
THE ROAD TO THE ISLAND by Tom Hazuka
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Soapiness aside, an often involving look back at a family, a town, and the lives in it."
You can—t go home again, it seems, and newcomer Hazuka does a fair job of showing why not, provided that a certain number of clinkers, stretchers, and forcing of parts are willingly overlooked. Read full book review >
DEAD MARCH by Ann McMillan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Historian McMillan's first novel is a rewarding period piece that mixes decorous tableaux out of Margaret Mitchell with unflinching glimpses of slavery, surgery, and the horrors of war and sudden death."
On the eve of Virginia's nervous preparations to join the Confederacy, Charley Wilson, a Richmond medical student pressed into service as a grave robber in order to satisfy Hampden-Sydney's need for anatomical specimens, sees that the latest corpse his little group has dug up did not go gently into that good night. Read full book review >
TURNING JAPANESE by David Galef
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Ambitious work, though place and person remain merely congruent, not welded, with an unsatisfying inertness as the result."
Galef's second (Flesh, 1995) is about a young American who goes abroad to find himself, in a novel that's likely to sweep readers up only sporadically. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >