Fiction & Literature Book Reviews (page 1818)

EXCEPT THE DYING by Maureen Jennings
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1997

"Surely this talented newcomer will conclude her next novel more compellingly."
How ungrateful of Therese Laporte to leave her maid's post with Dr. Rhodes in Toronto to sneak out of the house and return to her family back in Chatham without any notice or explanation but a hastily scrawled paper. Read full book review >
FRIENDS AND LOVERS by Eric Jerome Dickey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1997

"With four characters taking turns offering snippets of the story, it's sometimes hard to keep track of who's talking—but familiarity makes for smoother sailing through another success scored by Dickey. (Literary Guild selection; author tour)"
Second-novelist Dickey more than fulfills the promise shown in Sister, Sister (1996), again offering real characters and invigorating, believable dialogue. Read full book review >

MY ISHMAEL by Daniel Quinn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1997

"This is the weakest of Quinn's novels, but his ideas are as thought-provoking as ever, even so. (Author tour)"
Another irresistible rant from Quinn, a sequel to his Turner Tomorrow Fellowship winner, Ishmael (1992), concerning a great, telepathic ape who dispenses ecological wisdom about the possible doom of humankind. Read full book review >
WET PLACES AT NOON by Lee K. Abbott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 1997

"Too rich, perhaps, for some tastes, but fiction with a vigor, intelligence, and rueful wit sorely lacking from the work of many of Abbott's contemporaries."
More salty, exuberant tales of modern men struggling to make sense of their lives, fighting the temptation to make self- destructive gestures ``of the spectacular and dreadful kind,'' by a writer with one of the most distinctive voices in contemporary fiction. Read full book review >
THE GHOST by Danielle Steel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 1997

"Despite the usual Steelian menu of love, pain, and compassion, most fans will figure out the ending long before they get to it—and could probably supply the cadences as well."
In her 41st novel (Special Delivery, p. 751, etc.), Steel weaves touches of the paranormal into a historical romance. Read full book review >

TALES FROM THE BLUE ARCHIVES by Lawrence Thornton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 1997

"A simmering, passionately satisfying, character-driven finale. (Author tour)"
The rousing, tearjerking last of a trilogy (Imagining Argentina, 1987; Naming the Spirits, 1995) involving Argentine psychic Carlos Rueda. Read full book review >
PLAYS WELL WITH OTHERS by Allan Gurganus
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1997

A deft mixture of contrasting tones distinguishes this vigorous novel about the New York art scene ``Before'' and ``After'' the Age of AIDS, by the gifted author of Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All (1989) and White People (stories: 1991). Read full book review >
CAT CRIMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1997

"As in earlier entries in this long-running series (Cat Crimes Takes a Vacation, 1995, etc.), love of cats shines through a lot more clearly than love of mystery or suspense."
Nineteen new stories commemorating not just the December holidays but a veritable calendar of cats, from New Year's (Barbara Paul) to Martin Luther King Day (Jon L. Breen), Valentine's Day (Jeremiah Healy), Presidents' Day (Peter Crowther and Stewart von Allmen), St. Read full book review >
REVISION OF JUSTICE by John Morgan Wilson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1997

"A worthy successor to Wilson's Edgar-winning debut (Simple Justice, 1996)—a gay-themed '90s remake of Ross Macdonald's classic The Barbarous Coast."
Screenwriting teacher Gordon Cantwell's monthly networking party is where Hollywood hopefuls swap ideas and contacts while watching from the corners of their eyes to make sure nobody's climbing the greasy pole faster than they are. Read full book review >
THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 1997 by E. Annie Proulx
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1997

"All in all, a strong sampling of what the major magazines (the New Yorker, Paris Review, GQ, etc.) are publishing these days."
Over 80 years old, this admirable series might consider a new rule: No stories included that will appear in book form before the "best" volume does. Read full book review >
THE RIDDLE OF ALABASTER ROYAL by Patricia Veryan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Jollity, junkets, and a juicy mystery."
Another roistering Regency romance of mystery and suspense from the author of Lanterns (1996), among many, many others. Read full book review >
BAD MEDICINE by Aimée Thurlo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Like Ella's two previous cases (Death Walker, 1996, etc.), this one is too much of a good thing; trying to sort out the suspects and subplots is like wandering for hours and hours in a museum filled with fascinating exhibits."
En route to a homicide scene—Navajo rights activist Stanley Bitah has been clubbed to death—tribal police officer Ella Clah stops to check out a report of a drunk driver, only to find that Angelina Yellowhair isn't drunk but that she'd been fatally poisoned even before her car crashes. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >