History Book Reviews (page 2)

HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An intriguing, though perhaps incomplete, look at two cultures colliding and coexisting."
An exploration of the effects of Roman-era culture on Judaism. Read full book review >
ADOLFO KAMINSKY by Sarah Kaminsky
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Writing in Adolfo's voice gives this suspenseful narrative candor and immediacy."
A brilliant forger's 29-year resistance against oppression. Read full book review >

INDELIBLE INK by Richard Kluger
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A book of American history for all, but lawyers and journalists will especially appreciate it."
A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian looks back at the 1730s, when a single court case established the first step toward freedom of the press. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"History and biography lacking in intellectual curiosity or a coherent overarching concept."
Three mid-19th-century leaders shape their countries' destinies. Read full book review >
FAUSTIAN BARGAINS by Joan Mellen
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A book that will fuel conspiracy theorists and further blacken Johnson's legacy."
Linking LBJ to blackmail, intimidation, and even murder. Read full book review >

TROTSKY IN NEW YORK, 1917 by Kenneth D. Ackerman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An entertaining and informative account of a footnote to the life of one of the 20th century's most charismatic leaders."
An account of the two months in 1917 when Leon Trotsky "found refuge in the United States," where he experienced the "last gasp of the Belle Epoque." Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A comprehensive primer for how to contemplate urban spaces as they evolve for the future."
A creative city planner takes inspiration from the ancients' sense of urban integrity to propound a holistic approach to crafting the city space. Read full book review >
VIETNAM by Christopher Goscha
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A vigorous, eye-opening account of a country of great importance to the world, past and future."
America was not the first world power to meet defeat in far-distant Vietnam. The reasons for that loss emerge from this welcome overview of that nation's history. Read full book review >
THE BLACK PANTHERS by Bryan Shih
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"An interesting celebration of a unique era's activism, with greatest appeal to progressive readers."
An anthology commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Black Panthers focusing on the ordinary lives of its members. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A delightful, edifying tale written with intelligence and emotional sensitivity."
A brief history of the creation of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Read full book review >
GIRL by Alona Frankel
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 12, 2016

"A truly moving and bravely rendered memoir."
An impressionistic memoir of a Polish Jewish girl's survival hiding as a Gentile in Nazi-occupied Poland. Read full book review >
THE HISTORY AND UNCERTAIN FUTURE OF HANDWRITING by Anne Trubek
HISTORY
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Quirky facts enliven a brisk story of the history of handwriting."
A succinct overview of written communication. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jeff Chang
September 20, 2016

In the provocative essays in journalist Jeff Chang’s new book We Gon’ Be Alright, Chang takes an incisive and wide-ranging look at the recent tragedies and widespread protests that have shaken the country. Through deep reporting with key activists and thinkers, personal writing, and cultural criticism, We Gon’ Be Alright links #BlackLivesMatter to #OscarsSoWhite, Ferguson to Washington D.C., the Great Migration to resurgent nativism. Chang explores the rise and fall of the idea of “diversity,” the roots of student protest, changing ideas about Asian Americanness, and the impact of a century of racial separation in housing. “He implores readers to listen, act, and become involved with today’s activists, who offer ‘new ways to see our past and our present,’ ” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “A compelling and intellectually thought-provoking exploration of the quagmire of race relations.” View video >