Indie Book Reviews (page 642)

The Successful Jihad The Disuniting of the United States by P.S. Norac
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A particularly jumbled effort to preach to the conservative choir."
A muddled cry from the political right warns of a new brand of holy warriors dead set on "disuniting" our fair nation. Read full book review >
NOBODY HAS TO KNOW by Frank Nappi
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Fans of adrenaline-inducing storylines and bombshell plot twists should read this flawed thriller for the conclusion alone."
A contemporary reimagining of Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita with a Fatal Attraction twist, Nappi's latest (Sophomore Campaign, 2012, etc.) is a fast-paced thriller. Read full book review >

STATE OF UNION by Sven Michael Davison
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Though slightly programmed around action-blockbuster tropes, this harrowing cyber-pulp fiction brings the thrills."
As a synthetic plague causesmore and more humans to be implanted—"immunized"—with mind-control chips, ex-cop Jake "Jackhammer" Travissi, who survived his own digital zombification, fights the global conspiracy with his dwindling allies. Read full book review >
THE SUICIDE OF KATE EVERS by Eugene Kaster
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"Aside from some who's-who confusion, this novel is sure to entertain any sleuth."
With his first novel, Kaster enters the murky waters of the murder mystery genre with a whopper of a whodunit. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"A thin, uneven recounting of a long congressional career."
In her debut, Williams offers a brief overview of the personal and professional life of her cousin, the long-serving Democratic U.S. Rep. John Conyers Jr. of Michigan. Read full book review >

TOBY AND TUTTER THERAPY DOGS by Kirsten DeBear
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"Dog-loving preschoolers will want to hear it again and again; a good addition to a library or school's nonfiction collection."
Dogs and kids go together like peanut butter and jelly in DeBear's picture book about therapy dogs. Read full book review >
THE PARENTS' AND EDUCATORS' MANUAL OF TEEENAGE by Bruce G. Bentley
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"An insightful book to help parents and educators become smart, sensitive and strong caregivers."
A longtime social worker offers advice on raising adolescents in his debut. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"A raunchy, epic journey as a man discovers he can be a hero in an unlikely way."
A zany tale of far-fetched adventures on a tropical island. Read full book review >
THE THREE SOULS by Bill Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"A wild idea, but thinly plotted and underdeveloped."
Three dead artists plot a prison break. Read full book review >
APHRODESIA by John Oehler
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"A brilliant, engaging twist on the traditional crime novel."
A sensually evocative thriller that satisfies and arouses. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"An engrossing portrait of a woman among men in wartime."
A freelance writer struggles to find her place among hard-nosed newsmen covering the Vietnam War in this depiction of wartime journalists. Read full book review >
EXIT: STAGE LEFT by Jack Coey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 2012

"Spare, evocative tales of alienation in the acting life."
Ten short stories, some interconnected, about actors at professional and personal crossroads. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
author of SEINFELDIA
August 22, 2016

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s new bestseller Seinfeldia is the hilarious behind-the-scenes story of two guys who went out for coffee and dreamed up Seinfeld —the cultural sensation that changed television and bled into the real world. Comedians Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld never thought anyone would watch their silly little sitcom about a New York comedian sitting around talking to his friends. NBC executives didn’t think anyone would watch either, but they bought it anyway, hiding it away in the TV dead zone of summer. But against all odds, viewers began to watch, first a few and then many, until nine years later nearly 40 million Americans were tuning in weekly. In Seinfeldia, TV historian and entertainment writer Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!” “Armstrong’s intimate, breezy history is full of gossipy details, show trivia, and insights into how famous episodes came to be,” our reviewer writes. “Perfect for Seinfeldians and newcomers alike.” View video >