Books by Anthea Bell

CABO DE GATA by Eugen Ruge
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"At times ruefully hilarious and absurd, this slight, philosophical book will humor anyone who's ever questioned his or her place in this unforgiving universe."
In German Book Prize winner Ruge's (In Times of Fading Light, 2013) new novel, a writer abandons his life in Berlin and embarks on a journey toward self-realization. Read full book review >
VASILISA THE BEAUTIFUL by Anthea Bell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"Older children and art students will respond warmly. (Picture book/folk tale. 8-12)"
The Russian tale of Vasilisa and Baba Yaga, reillustrated for a new generation. Read full book review >
DOT AND ANTON by Erich Kästner
by Erich Kästner, illustrated by Walter Trier, translated by Anthea Bell
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"A minor classic featuring a pair of intrepid protagonists, a comically suspenseful climax, and a mildly caricatured adult cast. (introduction, postscript) (Fiction. 9-11)"
An unlikely secret friendship leads to a scotched burglary and generous quantities of just deserts in this freshly translated caper from the author of Emil and the Detectives.Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A coolly told story of a harrowing time and a young woman's struggle to survive."
Simon's son gave her a tape recorder, and the result is a crisp, detailed memoir of her years as a U-Boat ("those who had gone underground in the Nazi period") in World War II-era Berlin. Read full book review >
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD by The Brothers Grimm
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Schenker's illustrations and design combine with Bell's graceful translation to take the breath away. (Picture book/fairy tale. 5-10)"
As she did with Hansel and Gretel (2013), Schenker employs intricate die cuts, patterned prints, bold lines and basic colors to create a haunting journey through the familiar Grimms tale.Read full book review >
PIED PIPER OF HAMELIN by The Brothers Grimm
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"This lovely and penetratingly creepy version of the familiar tale will linger long with readers. (Picture book/fairy tale. 5-9)"
This strange and unsettling tale is made all the stranger and more unsettling by Zwerger's spare, isolated figures in their pale interiors and landscapes, not to mention the rats that populate many of the versos until they are dispatched. Read full book review >
THE ROBBER HOTZENPLOTZ by Otfried Preussler
Released: March 26, 1965

"Their elaborate tracking simply snares them in the robber's den, and their involved escape includes outwitting a magician. The team of Kasperl and Seppel is sort of a lumbering counterpart of Laurel and Hardy. When described in full, their outlandish actions generally seem clumsy and foolish and not really terribly humorous. The book is translated from the German and is by the same author of Thomas Scarecrow and The Wise Men of Schilda (1963).</p>"
<p>Hotzenplotz's theft of a musical coffee mill set Kasperl and his straightman friend Seppel in pursuit of the notorious bandit. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE WITCH by Otfried Preussler
Released: Oct. 8, 1961

<p>All children who tremble at the thought of witches — allay your fears! — For as of Walpurgis Night last, the bad witches have been rendered powerless and only one good little witch remains. Read full book review >
THE LITTLE WATER SPRITE by Otfried Preussler
Released: Feb. 28, 1961

"Endowed with a daring spirit, this lively little sprite ventures into many exciting and amusing episodes, including a trip with a strong current over the mill wheel, a joke played on a naive fisherman which saves Cyprian the Carp, a punishment for contracting dry feet, and a host of additional pranks, games and adventures calculated to delight and entertain. The book received a special award in the German Children's Book Prize of 1957 and has been translated into several languages.</p>"
<p>An enchanting fantasy about the life of a young water sprite growing up in the cool green world of the mill pond. Read full book review >