Books by Dr. Seuss

MCELLIGOT'S POOL by Dr. Seuss
by Dr. Seuss, illustrated by Dr. Seuss, developed by Oceanhouse Media
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Jan. 9, 2013

"Another solid Seuss adaptation from Oceanhouse, which allows readers to hook plenty of goodies. (iPad storybook app. 3-7)"
In this iPad adaptation of the Seuss classic, a young fisherman is undeterred by the warning that there is nothing but trash where he is fishing. A little imagination and a lot of Seuss-ian descriptives make this a productive expedition indeed. Read full book review >
THE BIPPOLO SEED by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"The good Doctor may be dead these 20 years, but he's still good for splendid surprises. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Seven rhymed tales, dug from hard to find places! Look for millions of Seuss fans with bright shiny faces! Read full book review >
THE BIPPOLO SEED AND OTHER LOST STORIES by Dr. Seuss
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"Overall, the disappointingly bland treatment stifles the Seussian silliness readers expect. (iPad storybook app. 6-9)"
This "omBook" adaptation of the newly released posthumous collection of seven Seuss stories is a sadly telling demonstration of the dangers of one-size-fits-all app development. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Jan. 9, 2007

Nel, author of Dr. Seuss: American Icon, delivers a meticulously researched and scrupulously attributed commentary on Seuss's revolutionary 1957 beginning reader, The Cat in the Hat, its sequel, The Cat in the Hat Comes Back, and three short published pieces. Read full book review >

OH, THE PLACES YOU'LL GO! by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Feb. 10, 1990

"Montaigne pointed out that it's the journey that matters, not the arrival; here, Seuss explores the same philosophical message in his own inimitably wise and witty style."
Lightly disguised as one of the old versifier's fantastical journeys, a rueful survey of the pleasures and pitfalls along the road of life—a sort of commencement address for tots and their elders. Read full book review >
I AM NOT GOING TO GET UP TODAY! by James Stevenson
FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1987

"Though there is plenty of the repetition required by learning readers, there are also some unusual words like Memphis, suggesting that this is not the easiest easy reader; but it has enough appeal to keep beginners entertained."
After an eight-year interval, a Beginner Book by this well-loved originator of the series is welcome; and since Seuss hasn't chosen to illustrate it himself, we are lucky to have Stevenson as alternate. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 12, 1987

"The pictures are frisky and the prose bounces along, but the wit is no more sophisticated than in the author's children's books of the same vintage."
Trust Dr. Seuss to dream up seven naked ladies, then set them to the innocent task of discovering folksy "horse truths." Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 12, 1986

"Seuss, with 82 years and 44 books to his credit, is in better than "pretty good shape"; he's in top form with this book that's sure to delight "obsolete children," and even those of us who are merely obsolescent."
Over the past 30 years, Dr. Seuss has endeared himself to millions of youngsters (and harried older types) with his tales of such giggle-producing creatures as "The Cat in the Hat" and "Yertle the Turtle." Read full book review >
THE BUTTER BATTLE BOOK by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Feb. 12, 1984

"But in the aftermath of wide exposure to The Day After and other 1980s arousals, all this seems, however well-intended, a little simplistic, a little out-of-date, even a little out-of-keeping."
A parable of armaments escalation—from the Snick-Berry Switch to the Big-Boy Boomeroo—whose high-level meaning no child can miss. Read full book review >
HUNCHES IN BUNCHES by Dr. Seuss
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 12, 1982

"MPSLUGDR Seuss machine set on automatic."
What happens when a Dr. Seuss kid can't make up his mind turns out to be an exaggerated and slap-happily visualized version of what might happen to anyone. Read full book review >
DID I EVER TELL YOU HOW LUCKY YOU ARE? by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 12, 1973

"And so on, mechanically, with a few more goofy phrases than other recent Seuss but none of the old outrageousness."
In the manner but not the spirit of the author/artist who never left a platitude the way he found it, an old man in the Desert of Drize assures someone he calls Ducky that there are others who are "so muchly much-much more unlucky than you." Read full book review >
THE SHAPE OF ME AND OTHER STUFF by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: July 12, 1973

"Flabby."
Whoever is wearing Dr. Seuss' hat these days, his jog-along easy-reading list of shapes and his conventionally corky silhouettes can't shape up to Geisel's inspired zaniness. Read full book review >
THE LORAX by Dr. Seuss
illustrated by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Aug. 12, 1971

"And if the Once-let doesn't match the Grinch for sheer irresistible cussedness, he is stealing a lot more than Christmas and his story just might induce a generation of six-year-olds to care a whole lot."
The greening of Dr. Seuss, in an ecology fable with an obvious message but a savingly silly style. Read full book review >
I CAN LICK 30 TIGERS TODAY! AND OTHER STORIES by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 12, 1969

"This last is the only one that approaches the Seuss standard of zany inventiveness; the others merely lean on his name."
Wishy-washy Dr. Seuss; garishly illustrated, as the Cat in the Hat boasts "I Can Lick 30 Tigers Today," then dismisses them gradually until there's one left—and he'll have to wait until after lunch; his ancestors, the cats of Katzen-stein, discover that carrying each others' tails isn't democratic because there's always a last cat left out; his sister thinks up a "greenish, not too cleanish" Glunk who runs up the phone bill and won't go away until "We Un-thunk the Glunk together." Read full book review >
I HAD TROUBLE IN GETTING TO SOLLA SOLLEW by Dr. Seuss
FANTASY
Released: Aug. 12, 1965

"His dilemmas are of the broadly farcical, Tom and Jerry variety, which draw a fast big laugh but don't have the fantastic memorability of what was once seen on Mulberry Street."
It's an epic lament of a little, ratty-looking, yellow creature, for whom "nothing, not anything ever went wrong" until he had an accident, and then another... Read full book review >
GREEN EGGS AND HAM by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Oct. 3, 1960

"Line and wash- three colors flat."
Would you like them anywhere? — Well, try them before you finally refuse... Read full book review >
YERTLE THE TURTLE AND OTHER STORIES by Dr. Seuss
ANIMALS
Released: April 12, 1958

"A must for both remedial reading and reading aloud, the sweeping illustrations and the spontaneous verse of these three stories make them a welcome addition to that nonsensical but wise, wise world of the always popular Dr. Senss."
Three fables by the inimitable Dr. Seuss, which originally appeared in Redbook magazine, are now available, by popular demand, in this book-form collection. Read full book review >
HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS! by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1957

"Irrepressible and irresistible."
Another Seuss-chimera joins the ranks of the unforgettable Herlar and with the advent of the Grinch— a sort of Yule Ghoul who lives in a cave just north of who-ville. Read full book review >
THE CAT IN THE HAT by Dr. Seuss
Released: June 15, 1957

"Back sewn."
A reissue of the earlier Houghton, Mifflin educational edition, brought out specifically as a text for beginning readers, brings back the story of that rainy day at home when the Cat in the Hat arrived to upset things and put them back in order again. Read full book review >
IF I RAN THE CIRCUS by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1956

"From the Foon to the Hoodwink they come prancing by to give you a treat of the Seuss's mind's eye and with Sneelock as hero and Morris announcing, we have a Circus McGurkus astounding."
The Circus McGurkus got started, they say, in the mind of young Morris McGurk, who one day got to thinking about the big vacant lot behind Sneelock's store. Read full book review >
ON BEYOND ZEBRA! by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 12, 1955

"Squirly que, pluperfect, misty and bewildered pictures accompany each of the new categories."
Dr. Seuss's own alphabet, made to order for anyone who things stopping at Z is a waste of time, cuts out nineteen new letters from yuzz to hi! and some fascinating new identifications for them which may or may not strike familiar chords. Read full book review >
HORTON HEARS A WHO! by Dr. Seuss
FANTASY
Released: Aug. 12, 1954

"Good stitching."
There's a small sensible social message along with the big nonsense here as Horton the elephant helps the "whos"- minute beings living in a rather perfect little society atop a dust particle. Read full book review >
IF I RAN THE ZOO by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1950

"However, this will not disappoint the devoted."
Dumheiten at its loosest and Seussest in the lastest eagerly-hailed silliness by the master of inanities. Read full book review >
BARTHOLOMEW AND THE OOBLECK by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 1949

"Just how the king gets rid of it is a bit on the silly side, but that wont worry Bartholomew's friends."
Bartholomew Cubbins, he of the 500 Hats and a long time favorite, has more adventures in this sequel. Read full book review >
THIDWICK THE BIG-HEARTED MOOSE by Dr. Seuss
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 12, 1948

"Not- on the child level- "the funniest book of the year"."
I've always though Dr. Seuss' type of humor appealed more to grownups than to children, and this is no exception. Read full book review >
MCELLIGOT'S POOL by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 12, 1947

"His imagination plays, instead, with the kinds of things the pool might provide — and the pictures are wonderful,- superb drawing, beautiful color, lots of humor in double page spreads throughout."
Utterly enchanting nonsense tale, which children and grown-ups will equally claim. Read full book review >
HORTON HATCHES THE EGG by Dr. Seuss
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 12, 1940

"Sheer nonsense, but good fun."
This is the first time that Dr. Seuss has done a book which seems to be thoroughly juvenile in appeal. Read full book review >
THE KING'S STILTS by Dr. Seuss
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 12, 1939

"The quality of magnificent exaggeration, carried to the nth degree."
Dr. Seuss has a faculty for telling modern tales with a folk lore twist, and this new king-with-a-quirk story has a novel element that nonsense loving children will love. Read full book review >
THE 500 HATS OF BARTHOLOMEW CUBBINS by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 22, 1938

"A book of surer child appeal than And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street."
This is a modern fairy tale, of a small boy from the cranberry bogs, who got into hot water with the king because each time he removed his hat another hat appeared in its place. Read full book review >
AND TO THINK THAT I SAW IT ON MULBERRY STREET by Dr. Seuss
FICTION
Released: Sept. 28, 1937

"The underlying humor is quite adult."
I really don't think this is a juvenile at all. Read full book review >