Books by Jeff Zaleski

THE SOUL OF CYBERSPACE by Jeff Zaleski
NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 1997

A useful overview of the impact of religion on the Internet, offering lengthy, stimulating interviews with individuals active in Web culture. Among the issues being debated by the figures Zaleski (a contributing editor of Publishers Weekly and former nonfiction editor of Kirkus) has interviewed are the proper uses of Net sites (should they provide information for believers? serve as a forum for recruiting new members? to what extent could they, or should they, supplant existing religious communities?) and, more provocatively, the extent to which the experience of virtual reality and a community composed purely of minds might generate an entirely new form of spirituality. Zaleski (Transformation: Awakening to the Sacred in Ourselves, 1995, with Tracy Cochran) is a thorough and sympathetic guide, allowing those he interviews to speak for themselves and providing useful background to both the growth of new forms of spirituality in our society and the parallel explosion of a virtual culture. A concise, stimulating introduction to an increasingly intriguing part of Internet society. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

James Joyce had the epiphany. The '60s had LSD. Today people are turning every which way in search of enlightenment and transformation. Tracy Cochran found it the hard way: She was embraced by the light during a mugging in Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen. Her husband, Jeff Zaleski, a lapsed Catholic, had his moment of revelation when his father died and he learned that ``because [death] is real, life is real.'' But brushes with death are not the only way to experience the sacred in life. And so, drawing on personal experience, literature, Tantric Buddhism, and other sources, freelance writer Cochran and Zaleski (former nonfiction editor of Kirkus) explore a range of events that can transform us and our perceptions of life, including love, creativity, and nature. Science takes a beating for the limitations of its logical empiricism. But cyberspace gets a thumbs-up, and a guide to electronic spiritual resources is included. Read full book review >