Jlarranaga
Genre
  • Thrillers

Jim Larranaga

James Michael Larranaga is the author of the quirky thriller, "In The Company of Wolves" (2013) as well as "The Dead Farmer's Almanac" (1999) and his upcoming Young Adult novel, "Blood Orange Soda" (2014).

Larranaga's fast-paced style with surprising reveals has his fans reading late into the night. His Goodreads.com reviews had this to say about "In The Company of Wolves":

"The main premise of the plot had me in a bit of a tizzy. It felt immoral. It felt morbid. It felt utterly genius! And I can't explain my shock when  ...See more >


Jim Larranaga welcomes queries regarding:
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"A wild, mind-bending read..."

Kirkus Reviews


AWARDS, PRESS & INTERESTS

ABNA Quarter Finalist, 2013: IN THE COMPANY OF WOLVES: THINNING THE HERD

Hometown Minneapolis, MN

Favorite book Neither Wolf Nor Dog by Kent Nerburn (Favorite recent book.)

Day job Full-time Author


BOOKS REVIEWED BY KIRKUS:

THRILLERS
Pub Date:

In Larranga’s (Dead Farmer’s Almanac, 2000) second novel, a mentally unstable bounty hunter gets caught in a world where death and high-stakes payoffs come prematurely for the terminally ill.

Quin Lighthorn was released from a mental institution in order to help the FBI with an undercover operation—or so he thought. As part of Lighthorn’s undercover job, he becomes an intern at Safe Haven, a firm that pays out a portion of a life insurance plan to a terminally ill person so long as that person makes the firm the insurance policy’s beneficiary. Within minutes of his first day on the job, Lighthorn witnesses a murder. From there, the plot begins to unravel: Lighthorn isn’t who he says he is; he isn’t working for the FBI; he’s delusional; his girlfriend may or may not be real; he falls in love with someone else—all that on top of the murder mystery. Sprinkled throughout the twisting storylines, Lighthorn gets sage advice from an adoptive Native American grandfather: “The raven is a good sign....He is the trickster who steals from the wolf. The wolf respects the raven and will not harm him.” The main characters are generally well-developed, but there’s so much going on within Lighthorn that it’s hard to keep up. Between his hallucinations, his flashbacks to the violent deaths of his parents and his doctor’s sharing a diagnosis of manic depression with almost everyone, readers may have a hard time knowing exactly what’s going on in what started out as a simple good-vs.-evil premise. The abrupt ending wraps up a few plotlines, but numerous loose ends could easily lead to a follow-up.

A wild, mind-bending read that can be a bit convoluted.

ONLINE:

In the Company of Wolves