Books by Mary Watson

THE WICKERLIGHT by Mary Watson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 26, 2019

"A bleak and brooding contemporary fantasy that sells magic short. (glossary) (Fantasy. 14-18)"
An outsider encounters a secret magical war in this sequel to The Wren Hunt (2018). Read full book review >
THE WREN HUNT by Mary Watson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 6, 2018

"Lush, if meandering and muddled; good for fans of Maggie Stiefvater and Holly Black. (Fantasy. 14-18)"
Augurs scry prophecies from patterns, but 17-year-old Wren Silke is uncertain about her own future. Read full book review >
THE BUTTERFLY SEEDS by Mary Watson
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

A lightweight story serves principally as a vehicle for Watson's lush, transporting paintings of New York City a hundred years ago. Young Jake, on his way to America from Ireland with his family, is given a packet of seeds by his beloved grandfather. Plant them, promises the grandfather, and butterflies will appear. Everyone Jake encounters gives him a handthe customs man doesn't confiscate the seeds, his father's new boss crafts him a window stand, and his many new friends gather soil. When the flowers come up, butterflies appear. This emigrant's tale contrasts mightily with many tales of hardship out there, but why shoot a butterfly with a cannon? Even if the tale has no drama, there is no denying the power of the artwork: The best street scenes shimmer like the work of Childe Hassam, and there are lovely touchessuch as when an unraveling ball of yarn connects those on the boat with those still on the dock. (Picture book. 4+) Read full book review >
THE MARKET LADY AND THE MANGO TREE by Pete Watson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

Sitting solid and capable amid her produce, ``Market Lady'' schemes: she'll capture the mangoes on the tree above her before they fall to the ground—where by custom they would be fair prey for the eager children flocking around her stall. Installing her nets on other trees as well, she corners the mango market and sells enough to buy herself a Mercedes. Then, a nightmare concerning greedy hippos that devour her mangoes and threaten her own safety results in a Scrooge-like change of heart: ``You can't earn a living by selling what's free,'' she concludes. Pete Watson, who bases his protagonist on ``Mama Benz,'' a merchant he encountered while serving in the Peace Corps in Benin, holds attention with his brisk pacing and amusing details; his wife's boldly rendered paintings are full of vigor and good humor. For both, a strong debut. (Picture book. 4-8) Read full book review >