BENEATH THE STONE by

BENEATH THE STONE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A full circle of eat-and- as a German officer -- his for a frustrated against the to whom an English is brought, relives his whole English and its slights, to his rationalizes his proposed treatment of his prisoner. His plans fall through because of his prisoner's invulnerability, his wife's inability to forward his scheme, and the story, told by a sadistic Gestapo agent, of the captive's romance with a Balkan patriot's daughter, von Borst's rigid adherence to the codes and rules of his upbringing are defeated by the very qualities he hates in the English, and with a single, humanitarian gesture, he makes vengeance to himself the only answer. Static in action but holding in mental tenseness, and interesting because of the German first person telling. Perhaps a bit lush, synthetic, but a savage picture of Nazi terrorism south of the Danube sometime in 1941, and an acute depiction of German psychology.

Pub Date: Aug. 10th, 1945