WOODROW WILSON AND COLONEL HOUSE by A L. & J. L. George

WOODROW WILSON AND COLONEL HOUSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Wilson centenary, already well celebrated biographically, is here crowned with an analysis of the extraordinary relationship between Wilson and Colonel House. Two men, each immensely ambitious and politically inspired, one with a compelling need for approval and affection, the other able to give unstintingly of himself, join fates and further find their individual fates joined to historical crisis, enmeshed and inseparable from world destiny -- such is the unraveling of the web. For inner reasons Wilson could brook no interference, no compromise in any measure, nor could be take independent action. He was craven and gullible yet loftily superior. Colonel House, psychically no less crippled, could not directly assume office nor seek public recognition, and yet he found his triumph vicariously through his ingenious capacity to cajole, manipulate and outfox those in power and while playing the role of sycophant never lost sight of his target. House's views coincided largely with Wilson's making his blind cooperation at least possible. But the marvel and horror is that he could differ in smaller issues, hating Wilson with fury -- and continue unceasingly in his shouts of adulation. An intriguing presentation for both the student of political history and the generally well-informed.

Pub Date: Dec. 28th, 1956
Publisher: John Day