These typical fifteen hours do not include the writing of books (Dr. Chapman has published about one a year for the last...

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IT'S ALL ARRANGED: Fifteen Hours in a Psychiatrist's Life

These typical fifteen hours do not include the writing of books (Dr. Chapman has published about one a year for the last ten). They begin in his native Kansas City's Mt. Sinai where he talks to Mr. Rattner who gets cyclical jolts of shock, Mrs. Draper, a three-time schizophrenic (""a smorgasbord"" of theories explain this condition), Mrs. McLaughlin whom he can't ever handle or help. . . . On to St. Catharine's hospital where a girl has scratched her eyes out and there are autistic twins and a kid hooked on junk. Three o'clock is his ""crud hour"" during which he props up patients in short sessions; there are longer sessions with other private ones; and the day, or rather evening, ends with the slow drone of a departmental meeting. Chapman is a good man, sensible -- would that this were not a depressing word in itself -- and he learned from Harry Stack Sullivan that ""It's the patients who teach you psychiatry. Spend as much time with them as you can."" Perhaps that's why one of them here comments, ""He's on our side."" Aa for the book, it offers at least two convincingly forthright fifty-minute hours with very genuine human interest and a sense of psychiatry as neither dogma nor shamanism.

Pub Date: Jan. 6, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1974