All Thy Conquests launched a newcomer with a significant first novel. Shadow of Heaven bears the stamp of bitterness,...

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SHADOW OF HEAVEN

All Thy Conquests launched a newcomer with a significant first novel. Shadow of Heaven bears the stamp of bitterness, frustration, loss of idealism, all too recognizable post-war factors of young writing. But he writes well enough so that we can postpone judgment as to his ultimate achievement. Let's hope this is simply an interlude, albeit one that leaves a bad taste in the mouth...Harry Oberon was a good guy; he had the cause of labor on a pedestal of sorts, he worked hard for his beliefs. But he felt he was getting nowhere, had achieved nothing, was a flop. And he was fed up with Margaret his current ""woman"". He thought she was going to let him out of it quietly, but he did a crude thing- and she hit back. But before she struck, he almost got enmeshed with Janet, war widow, kept in a virtual strait jacket by her father-in-law, whose motives would not have born close scrutiny. Then Janet broke loose- attempted to throw her cap over the windmill, but Harry would have none of it. So Janet goes quietly mad, and Harry gets punished for what he hadn't done, with the help of Margaret. And it all winds up with a messy motor crash, with Margaret's death, and with Harry- touch and go- at the hospital. Pretty grim little piece, written- much of it- in stream of consciousness style, with more than a hint of early Faulkner. Libraries- beware.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Howell, Soskin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1947