When Alexander the Great set out to conquer what constituted the known world-Asia and Asia Minor- he took along two clever,...

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ALEXANDER'S HORSES

When Alexander the Great set out to conquer what constituted the known world-Asia and Asia Minor- he took along two clever, trustworthy stableboys to look after his beloved horses, in particular the almost legendary Bucephalus, whom he alone tamed and rode. Through the adventures of the boys, Nepos and Phidon, the reader follows the victories and near defeats of the fabulous young king of Macedonia and Greece, from his early skirmishes with the Persians to the moment when, astride Bucephalus, he masters the King of India. This was a battle that pitted swift steeds against slow mastodons. Bucephalus died in his mater's hour of greatest triumph, and as a monument to him, Alexander named a city in his honor. Symbolically, this marked the death of the Greek in Alexander, and the birth of the Asian influence in his thought and person. And the stable boys, now grown to manhood, returned home richer and sadder. Suspense and action against an unhackneyed background should hold boys' interest, while teachers will find that this book enriches background reading for history. One regrets what seems the intrusion of modern colloquialisms now and again, as a false note in a well-sustained and authentically researched tale.

Pub Date: April 1, 1959

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Longmans, Green

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1959