Six first-hand, first-rate accounts by white captives of American Indians--from Mary Rowlandson (1676) who during her...

READ REVIEW

TAKEN BY THE INDIANS: True Tales of Captivity

Six first-hand, first-rate accounts by white captives of American Indians--from Mary Rowlandson (1676) who during her wilderness trek watched her child die in her arms, to Fanny Kelly who in 1856 spent five months with the Sioux. These narratives are unusual in that they are all fairly detailed and straightforward--dwelling on observations of hunting expeditions, food foraging, astonishing migrations, settlement life and the hardships of bitter weather and harassment from whites. Prisoners taken by Indians were often ""adopted,"" if considered suitable, to replace a dead relative. Some chose to stay with the Indians for long periods, or even for life, like Mary Jemison who felt that her white kin would treat her and her Indian family ""like enemies. . . or with cold indifference which I could not endure."" In all cases the captives witnessed violence, but they were able to understand the reasons for it and to appreciate also the dilemmas of a people being driven from their land. A beautifully edited and valuable collection.

Pub Date: March 1, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Franklin Watts

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1976