With some leavening of anecdote, and personalities, this is nonetheless a strictly professional autobiography in the field...

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FIVE MILLION PATIENTS

With some leavening of anecdote, and personalities, this is nonetheless a strictly professional autobiography in the field of public health. The author chronicles his career, from student days in Johns Hopkins in 1901, through internship at Newark City Hospital where he made a final decision against surgery; to Richmond, where he found the field he made his own, public health. He rose to be medical inspector, assistant commissioner of health; he learned much of typhoid, diphtheria, smallpox, hookworm, trachoma, T.B.. He went to Kansas as U.S. Spidimologist and further research into VD, pneumonia, influenza, botulism. He writes of his work during World War I, his travels, teaching at Johns Hopkins, his varied contacts in the field of public health. Here are the contributions of the Rockefeller Foundation, of State Legislatures in forwarding local and national welfare, the progress in knowledge, treatment and preventative measures, the still present gaps in overcoming certain of the diseases. Vocational and special interests primarily.

Pub Date: Oct. 14, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1946