As a symbol of impoverished Spaniards, Uncle Jacinto is the embodiment of a people who will ""not accept disaster and...

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MY UNCLE JACINTO

As a symbol of impoverished Spaniards, Uncle Jacinto is the embodiment of a people who will ""not accept disaster and shame"" with his pride in a career lost to him through drink and sickness, which will not let him accept an offer to take part in a comic bull-fight. But when he sees that seven year old Pepote is about to be taught how to beg he decides to take the offer -- and then must find ways to raise money to hire the proper costume. He has a small part in an art racket; he lands in jail when he tried to peddle watches; and he collapses when he undertakes to unload a truck. Pepote gets him clothed and to the ring, sees the beginning of Jacinto's mastery of the bull and misses the disgrace that follows his uncle's near-comeback. And Jacinto, realizing Pepote can remember him in greatness, is still among the unbeaten. Mood-making, the soft focus here on the man and boy does not extend to its picture of harsh poverty in Madrid.

Pub Date: Oct. 8, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1958