Thinly disguised as a novel, this is really a paean of enthusiasm for Albania, a travelogue de luxe, with undertones and...

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BINGING WATERS

Thinly disguised as a novel, this is really a paean of enthusiasm for Albania, a travelogue de luxe, with undertones and overtones of social documentation. Personally, I wish she'd done a Black Lamb and Grey Falcon sort of book, instead of cloaking her facts about the country and its people in a slight story of a spoiled cosmopolite who finds herself when she is persuaded to see Albania and its hill people and to study European civilization in its cradle. The heroine, Gloire no less, is somewhat preposterous in her posturing, as she gives up her mink coat for white trousers and goat-skin sandals, and, in the absence of plumbing, becomes conscious of her spiritual development. At the close, she decides to stay in Albania as an assistant to an elderly American doctor. Interesting solely for the introduction of the reader to a stalwart, magnetic people and a dramatic country; as a novel it is insignificant and superficial. If however lacking the popular appeal of some of her earlier books, this will have the sales impetus of the Literary Guild selection- for July.

Pub Date: June 18, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1946