One can hardly read that Inauguration Day 1969 was a ""great day in Washington"" without a feeling of dismay. And even...

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THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY

One can hardly read that Inauguration Day 1969 was a ""great day in Washington"" without a feeling of dismay. And even though Weiss concludes here by asking ""Have our Presidents stretched the Constitution too far?,"" her story of the office contains too many half-truths and careless exaggerations to help one decide. According to Weiss, ""no one"" criticized Jefferson's purchase of the Louisiana Territory; Teddy Roosevelt was a successful ""trust buster"" and Ford's biggest contribution to the Presidency has been his simple lifestyle. And Nixon ""a single person, working with a few advisors"" ended the war in Vietnam, though of course, when he ""took part in criminal activities"" he had to leave office. On this level of cut-and-dried hindsight we seem to be living in the best of all possible worlds. Veto it.

Pub Date: March 22, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 96

Publisher: Messner

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1976