The princess has no playmates; worse, her mother answers every question for her. Still, she amuses herself with the castle's...

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THE TAPESTRY CATS

The princess has no playmates; worse, her mother answers every question for her. Still, she amuses herself with the castle's faded tapestries, which depict wonderful animals--especially a golden tabby she calls Gold (""a lazy, friendly cat, as warm as honey and as heavy as sleep"") and another she names Silver (""as secret as moonlight and as quick as thought""). When her Fairy Godmother offers a wish for her seventh birthday, the Queen replies, ""Gold and silver. That's what she wants."" ""Yes!"" cries the delighted princess and--with a conspiratorial wink--the Godmother complies. The two cats come to life; the princess eventually learns to ""speak up for herself."" Morley's stylized, decorative art has an appropriately flat, tapestry-like appearance enlivened with calligraphic details such as the princess's flying hair. A couple of gutters are unfortunately placed; otherwise, an attractive setting for an unusually amiable talc, told with a pleasing poetic lilt.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1992

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 26

Publisher: "Little, Brown"

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 1992