When Satchelmouse (a mouse-shaped, trumpet-playing character who seems to be about ten inches tall) grants Sarah's wish to...

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SATCHELMOUSE AND THE DOLL'S HOUSE

When Satchelmouse (a mouse-shaped, trumpet-playing character who seems to be about ten inches tall) grants Sarah's wish to be the little girl in the dollhouse, he plays a trick on her: instead of becoming the ruffled, blond family darling, she is the servant girl, ordered about by all the other dolls. After a tough day's work Satchelmouse magics her back to her own form; having learned her upstairs-downstairs lesson, she switches the clothes on the two dolls and puts the servant doll in bed for a much-needed rest. This bit of consciousness-raising seems more germane to its British source than to American children. Munoz's freely drawn and brightly colored illustrations have vigor, but lack the precision and miniature appeal that make dollhouses so appealing.

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 1987

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Barron's

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 1987