After a long gap of years (during which he has written juveniles and non-fiction) Archie Binns has turned back again to...

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After a long gap of years (during which he has written juveniles and non-fiction) Archie Binns has turned back again to fiction, with a novel set in the upper reaches of the Puget Sound area. The story starts in Honolulu -- with two obviously mis-mated couples in juxtaposition. Circumstances -- and perhaps the balmy breezes of the tropics- combine to throw Tom Wells, whose marriage of convenience to Constance has never emerged into a mature and normal relationship, into a heedless, passionate, virtually consciencelessness elopement with the beautiful young Emily Barton, whose sadistic husband, Wallace, makes only futile gestures towards retaining her. They purchase passage- and a remote ideal island paradise- from a captain of dubious virtue. They cross stormy seas and make their landfall, disembark, and find themselves in a virtual wilderness. This is the story of how they came to terms with their environment- and with the lawless situation of their own contriving. Things worked out well for them; Wallace Barton conveniently died; Constance piously granted Tom a divorce, so that he could make an honest woman of Emily; and their wilderness was gradually converted into the promised paradise. All very pat and not too convincing. Archie Binns has lost the touch that gave authenticity and vitality to Lightship, many years ago.

Pub Date: March 28, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1957