The author of A Republican Look at his Parts which was regarded as the apologia for Modern Republicanism in 1956, (when he...

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The author of A Republican Look at his Parts which was regarded as the apologia for Modern Republicanism in 1956, (when he was Under Secretary of Labor) offers here a re- examination of our basic political and economic beliefs and a redefinition, in positive terms, of our system of government. Arthur Larson believes that our inadequacy in the competition for the ""uncommitted nations"" has been one of statement: ""we have failed to state plainly, positively and excitingly what we are for""- and as a result the U.S. system of government seen from the Near and Far East, is viewed only in antithesis to Communism and is clothed in the shroud Marx laid on nineteenth century Capitalism. He defines the U.S. system as Enterprise Democracy which is not socialism, not classical capitalism, but is based on the Lincoln concept that government should do for the people what needs to be done and what the people cannot do for themselves and which embodies ""a preference for the private as against the government way of doing things"". He insists that labor, business and government are not inherently opposed but rather support each other and he repudiates the ""right-wing"", ""left wing"" labels as inconsistent and therefore meaningless. He would substitute the terms ""narrow"" or ""broad"" for political positions and he demonstrates their application through an examination of reciprocal trade, labor relations, government regulations, farm issues, veterans' rights. His conclusion: that the U.S. has more in common with the new nations and ""uncommitted"" sections than it makes good use of; that because the needs, hopes and aspirations of peoples all over the world are the same, the key to understanding is identification. This will be read by the student of politics and will, because of the author's former connection with the Elsenhower administration, receive critical attention.

Pub Date: Feb. 9, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1958