Sundry career precepts loosely organized under five projected stages of working life. Uris and Tarrant (How to Keep from...

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CAREER STAGES: Surmounting the Crises of Working Life

Sundry career precepts loosely organized under five projected stages of working life. Uris and Tarrant (How to Keep from Getting Fired, Getting to the Top Fast, etc.) are the gabby, gather-everything-in sort. Their general idea is that business is a mysterious, perilous world. ""Most top managements resemble the Greek gods."" ""Many of the standards, along with the process by which they are applied, are. . . Kafkaesque."" Stage-wise: ""the extent to which betrayal is the norm. . . can come as a critical shock when you're in your twenties."" Or, in your forties, ""one of the unpleasant side effects of winning is the deterioration of friendships and the isolation that comes with being more successful than the others."" Much citation is made--to Shakespeare and Max Weber, Ruth Benedict and John Foster Dulles. Little contrived case histories illustrate every point. And, certainly, office romances can be dangerous to your career (Stage III, The Power Decade), while the person who responds ""coolly and logically"" to an early failure (Stage II, The Learning Decade) will be less hampered in the future. But there is nothing in those ideas, and others of that ilk, that has not been discussed more discerningly and straight-forwardly elsewhere.

Pub Date: June 6, 1983

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Seaview/Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1983