A sleek, slick, snappy-paced first novel, with hard-nosed polish from first corpse to last; and what should have been a...

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BINO

A sleek, slick, snappy-paced first novel, with hard-nosed polish from first corpse to last; and what should have been a disastrous gimmick--a 6'6"" albino lawyer hero--not only seems plausible but likable. Bino's been set-up. Invited to a political fund-raiser by college acquaintance Winston ""Winnie"" Anspatcher III for a reunion, supposedly, with conservative candidate Art Stammer (who also remembers Bino from the old days, before Alcindor plowed in and demolished his knee), Bino instead becomes Art's target--since Art sees him as the living embodiment of the anti-law-and-order stance, the scourge of a safe Dallas, and a stand-in for Bino's dead mentor Richard Bigelow, the liberal politician who probably would have held office forever but for a perfectly aimed shot. Bino decks Stammer, stamps out, then starts in motion a search for Bigelow's assassin(s). Helping him: Half-a-Point Harrison, the bookie/investigator with whom he shares office space; his secretary Dodie, who used to do drugs, reformed, got a couple of college degrees, then, maybe stupidly, slept with her boss once; Barney, golf maven and mover of dead bodies in automobiles; also, slinky F.B.I. agent Karen Allen, who appears in about as many guises as Mata Haft, then disappears, courtesy of high-ups bent on covering-up. Meanwhile, there are Buster with a red sheen to his moustache; Johnny and his hyperactive knife; Winnie and Art, and Dante Tirelli, now married to Annabelle (Bino's ex), who's extra chummy with mob boys back in New York. Clever twist: Bino is hired by Buster to represent him in the Bigelow conspiracy after first trying to kill Bino (nothing personal about that, you unnerstan, just business is all). Great dialogue, propelled along with a sardonic zip. More of Bino is in order.

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 1988

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 1988