The title tells the whole story in a nutshell. The book is simply an instructive exhibition of one of the newest sporting...

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SKY JUMPERS

The title tells the whole story in a nutshell. The book is simply an instructive exhibition of one of the newest sporting crazes to hit the scene -- free fall parachuting, more popularly known as skydiving. The sport is often brushed off as a risky, showy pastime of thrill seekers. As this book seeks to demonstrate, however, parachuting is a perfectly legitimate form of athletics, ""...a sport that takes skill and technique, mental and physical training. It isn't daredevil or acting the fool, and it's got more bang than hot rodding..."" The plot, such as it is, concerns 17 year old Chuck Steel who decides that parachuting would be a better outlet than racing his car on the highways, and so talks his gang into forming a skydiving club, the Sky Jumpers. The group gets the most careful training, requires parental permission, etc. There's a bit of a hitch when one of the boys doesn't succeed. To get around this he joins another group, the Outlaws, which goes in for daredevil stuff and will let him jump. It's only a ruse to convince his father, however, for the boy is really on the side of careful jumping, and eventually the whole club comes to see the light. The book ends up in the clouds in a competition between the Sky Jumpers and the Outlaws, Chuck and his girl showing off their technique by kissing in mid-air. It is the same fiction formula, almost the same story, that has been used to teach such sports as surfing, hot rodding, motorcycling, etc., etc., etc. and endlessly so forth.

Pub Date: April 14, 1965

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: John Day

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1965