The title-page spread of this British import shows a row of attached houses, with various activities occurring on the street...

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The title-page spread of this British import shows a row of attached houses, with various activities occurring on the street and glimpsed through the windows. But here and throughout, whether the people are building a snowman, moving furniture, or blowing out birthday candles, there are no enticing out-of-the-way details to capture the imagination. The most curosity-catching item has a bobby shining a flashlight on the leg of a burglar who is disappearing through an upstairs window. The rest of the book takes us along the street from house number one to number twelve, in predictable verse and alternate whole and half pages, after John Goodall, so that we see each house first from the outside and then from within. At number one a family is moving out, and the required surprise, punctuation mark, or what-you-will at the end consists of the same family moving into number twelve. The half-page device is not used creatively as it was in Goodall's early Paddy Pork books, and the inside views just confirm what the street scene suggested, without providing any new slants. The pictures are agreeable enough, if not very interesting, and kids will probably find the novelty passingly diverting.

Pub Date: Aug. 25, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1980