The Love Seekers is the account of a social worker's experiences among ""the loneliest, the sickest, and the hungriest...

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THE LOVE SEEKERS

The Love Seekers is the account of a social worker's experiences among ""the loneliest, the sickest, and the hungriest people you will ever meet"": the prostitutes, drug addicts, alcoholics, and lesbians of any modern city. The author's purpose is not to edify, or to entertain, or to delight; the stories of her ""girls"" are not particularly inspiring, nor do they often have happy endings. Rather, she seeks to give an understanding of the causes of personal tragedies, social and individual and to elicit a spirit of sympathy rather than of disgust or condemnation. Miss Byrne accomplishes that, despite an occasional and understandable tendency to make her subjects sound like extracts from a standard collection of case histories, and The Love Seekers will be an eye-opener for everyone who is curious about life on the seamy side. The book is neither pious, optimistic nor, consequently, idealistic. It may be recommended to all classes of readers as a graphic portrayal, and a moving one, of the victims of what hitherto has not been a noticeably Great Society.

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Newman

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966