Beyond the current headline vogue, the attributes of ""soul food""--an imaginative culinary contribution of Southern...

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THE SOUL FOOD COOKBOOK

Beyond the current headline vogue, the attributes of ""soul food""--an imaginative culinary contribution of Southern Negroes--seem to have been bypassed nationally. Which is unfortunate, since in the use of simple, fresh ingredients, one-pot processes, creative combinations of vegetables, particularly, ""soul food"" is unique in America and could be compared favorably with the peasant food of Provence. Indeed, if ""Cream of Hog's Head"" sounds dreadful, pronouncing the title of the French delicacy may smooth the way. Vegetables are often fried with meat, enhanced by butter and sugar. Innards of various sorts are carefully soaked and fried with lively sauces. Yet although hearty this is not oppressively lubricious fare. For the thrifty and adventurous--bake, baby, fry.

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 1969

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1969