Heinz (The Wolves, p. 1235) and Van Zyle team up for an involving glimpse of the lives of traditional I€upiat people....

READ REVIEW

KAYUKTUK

Heinz (The Wolves, p. 1235) and Van Zyle team up for an involving glimpse of the lives of traditional I€upiat people. Aknik is not allowed to be among the men of the village when they hunt agvik, the bowhead whale, because he fails to bring back meat from his carefully constructed snares. Something steals his bait, leaving no trace; the Shaman tells him that he must discover the identity of the one that empties his snares: ""Kayuktuk, the Shadow Without a Body."" Aknik returns to his snares and waits, then trails a fox to its den, where he finds it feeding his bait to her kits. How to prove to the village that there was a thief? Aknik brings snow home and shows the others the paw print of the fox, explaining that he had not taken the mother's one pelt because there will be so many more in the fall. Readers never know whether Aknik's decision is based on a tradition of genuine wildlife management, or a nod to contemporary sensibilities regarding trapping. However, the lengthy text is dramatic; the paintings are a realistic accompaniment.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1996

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Chronicle

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 1996