Carl B. Kaufmann is concerned with the tools and techniques, the ideas about himself and his labor, of corporate man, with...

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MAN INCORPORATE

Carl B. Kaufmann is concerned with the tools and techniques, the ideas about himself and his labor, of corporate man, with the relationship between the individual and the organization, and the preservation of man's sense of identity in a society that is increasingly institutionalized. His premise is that ""failing to find purpose in his work, it seems reasonable to conclude, man is not likely to find purpose anywhere else."" His assertion that ""there never has been a 'leisure society,' and there is no reason to suppose that there ever will be,"" indicates the tenor and independence of his approach. He surveys the institutional heritage of work, the role of technology, the ethic of work (St. Benedict: ""Laborare est orare"") and commerce. He goes on to the American synthesis (""the habit of work"") with its consolidation and integration evolving into the modern corporation, reviews the corporate experience for employer and employee alike, manager and managed, lancing organization man myths along the way. The corporation in society takes up his final concern, and moves him to the assertion that ""man incorporate, for all his imperfections and failings, is an uncommonly useful man."" For all that, his eyes are wide open, his arguments persuasive.

Pub Date: March 17, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966