A rose-colored look at the personalities who have imbued 20th-century pacifism with its special brand of conviction....

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TROUBLESOME PEOPLE: The Warriors of Pacifism

A rose-colored look at the personalities who have imbued 20th-century pacifism with its special brand of conviction. Moorehead, a London Times journalist, is previously author of Fortune's Hostages and Sidney Bernstein. Moorehead divides her study into two parts, corresponding to two distinct brands of pacifism. The first part explores the pacifism that grew out of the First World War, with its mass conscriptions. This was a pure pacifism that held violence of any kind to be wrong. (Prior to the Great War, pacifism as a movement was nonexistent, since most wars had been fought prior to then by professional soldiers.) This first wave of pacifism was fueled by such figures as Fenner Brockway, and the writings of Gandhi. The second half of the book follows the nuclear protestors, whose militance in pursuit of peace questions the very relationship of the citizen to the state. Writing from her English perspective, Moorehead pays special attention to the history of English pacifism and its modern manifestations, such as the ladies of Greenham Common, who have camped for some four years at the edge of a military base. Her weakness is in giving only perfunctory attention to America, West Germany, and Japan, which together comprise only a Fifth of her book. Still, here is solid reporting based upon interviews with many of the surviving participants, worshipfully rendered.

Pub Date: July 28, 1987

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Adler & Adler--dist. by Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1987