One gets to wondering if anyone is monitoring publications over at Catalyst, the women's resource organization: this is the...

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WHEN CAN YOU START?

One gets to wondering if anyone is monitoring publications over at Catalyst, the women's resource organization: this is the third book to include information on self-assessment, rÉsumÉs, and interviews, the second to do so in detail. Still, it may be the best: punchy; crammed with options, approaches, and alternative approaches; good-naturedly assertive without a trace of militarism. In addition to helping the job hunter sort out education from experience, executive search firms from non-profit agencies, etc., it suggests more unusual factors to attend to: the kind of physical work environment that will make you happy, the value of portfolios whatever your profession, the way to use both formal and informal networking, how to check for job openings (outside the agencies and classified ad columns). Some of the more ingenious solutions to finding an opening? Check to see whether any local employers are being sued for discrimination: (wryly) ""they'll probably be hiring."" And where other job counselors get bogged down in either/or debates, this charts a sane middle course: put a job objective on your rÉsumÉ only if you have an unvarying objective, omit it if you'd consider a broader range. The returning homemaker gets little special attention here; this is more appropriate for job changers (as Making the Most of Your First Job, p. 402, was most appropriate for the new college grad). But it's a strong weapon in a woman's arsenal against a life sentence to secretarial or other humdrum slots.

Pub Date: Jan. 20, 1981

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1981